All posts tagged: World Press Photo

World Press Photo head Lars Boering on introducing stringent new Ethics Code to ensure ‘truth’ of entries

Lars Boering, managing director of the World Press Photo Foundation, has claimed this year’s World Press Photo awards will not be hamstrung by findings of image manipulation, after the introduction of a new Code of Ethics for all entrants. Boering said of the 2016 awards, which were announced today: “We are delighted by the outcome this independent jury produced, and ready to present an exhibition of powerful imagery to an audience that can trust what they see.” The new code of ethics ensured “a transparent and rigorous verification process,” he said, adding: “This resulted in many more entries being checked, but fewer problems than last year being found. In ten days, we will be releasing a detailed technical report reviewing the verification process, and we will then lead the public conversation on these issues.” Last year was not one World Press Photo will remember with fondness, with news breaking – on the day the winners were announced – that more than 20 percent of the final-round entries had been disqualified. The images in question, the jury had decided, had been manipulated after the …


World Press Photo’s chair of the ‘People’ jury on looking for strong concepts

“This is the only category where you can have a concept for the photography,” says Narda van t’ Veer, founder of the Dutch photo agency UNIT C.M.A and creator of the Amsterdam-based Ravestijn Gallery, and chair of the People category jury in the 2016 World Press Photo competition. “The other categories – the spot news, general news and so on – are mainly about urgent matters. We were interested in series which, though they might be about urgent matters, could also be considered in a conceptual way, in the way that they’re photographed. That is why we chose Exposure by Kazuma Obara.” Kazuma Obara’s image, which won first Prize in the People stories category, traces the life of a girl born in Kiev just after the Chernobyl disaster. The image was shot on 30-year-old colour film found five kilometres from the abandoned nuclear power plant, and the faded, patchy, grey images eloquently evoke a life also been blighted by the disaster. “It is a beautifully illustrated story,” van t’ Veer tells BJP, “and has a very strong concept”. This conceptual …


After spending two days and two nights sailing on the Mediterranean Sea on the deck of the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières - Doctors Without Borders) search and rescue ship Bourbon Argos, rescued migrants - still wrapped in their emergency blankets - catch sight of the Italian coast for the first time soon after dawn. 23 August 2015 In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers. Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity (c) Francesco Zizola

Francis Kohn, chair of the 2016 World Press Photo jury, on judging the prize

“We had a great number of stories, the majority of stories, were on the migrant refugees in Europe,” says Francis Kohn, photo director of Agence France-Presse and chair of the 2016 World Press Photo jury of the prize this year, after judging the general news, spot news and long term project categories. “There is a big gap between these stories and Nepal – a lot on the earthquake in Nepal – I think third would be….attacks in Paris, Charlie Hebdo in January and then in November. The rest [of the stories] are quite spread out.” Making his comments in a video made by the WPP team, Kohn added he was looking for images that witness an important event, as “this is World Press Photo”, but beyond that “obviously a picture has to be strong, compelling, has to work on so many different levels – being there, witnessing, and then it has to tell me something.” But, he cautioned, it doesn’t necessarily have to be in monochrome – as the eventual winner, by Warren Richardson, turned out to …


Lost Family Portraits © Dario Mitidieri

World Press Photo: The Winners

The title of World Press Photo of the Year goes to Warren Richardson for his picture of a man and child captured by moonlight as they attempted to cross the border from Serbia to Hungary last summer. And the first places in each of the four main news categories include scenes from the shores of Lesvos, a Kurdish hospital, and the heavily bombarded suburb of Douma on the outskirts of Damascus. Announced from Amsterdam this morning, following newly introduced checks to ensure the winning images met tightened codes on image manipulation, the jury gave prizes in eight categories to 41 photographers, selected from 82,951 images submitted by 5775 photographers from 128 countries. Richardson, an Australian photographer based in Hungary, wins 1st prize in the singles category for Spot News with the same image, while the 1st prize story goes to Sameer Al-Doumy for his reportage from rebel-held Douma, which has been subject to months of heavy aerial bombardment on the back of a two-year siege. In General News, Mauricio Lima, a veteran Brazilian working on …


Migrants crossing the border from Serbia into Hungary (c) Warren Richardson

Warren Richardson’s image wins World Press Photo of the Year Award

Titled Hope for a New Life, the Australian freelance photographer’s winning picture, part of the series Refugee Crisis Hungary, shows refugees crossing the border between Horgoš, Serbia and Röszke, Hungary. Taken at 3am in the morning on 28 August 2015, the man and child were part of the movement of people seeking to cross into Hungary before a secure fence on the border was completed. The image also won first prize in the Spot News category. Winners of all other categories can be seen here. The 47-year-old Richardson is a self-taught freelance photographer currently based in the Hungarian capital Budapest; he said of the image: “I camped with the refugees for five days on the border. A group of about 200 people arrived, and they moved under the trees along the fence line. They sent women and children first, then fathers and elderly men. “I must have been with this crew for about five hours, and we played cat and mouse with the police the whole night. I was exhausted by the time I took the picture. It was around three …


World Press Photo announces the inaugural Masterclass Latin America

World Press Photo’s annual Joop Swart Masterclass, held in Amsterdam annually, has been running for over 20 years, selecting photojournalists and documentary photographers from around the world and offering expertise and support. Last year’s intake included Bego Antón, Raphaela Rosella and Sarker Protick (featured in our Ones to Watch issue in January 2014). In an effort to cast a wider, more diverse net, the World Press Photo Foundation is implementing a new series of regional masterclasses to develop global talent. The first regional event is the World Press Photo Masterclass Latin America, run in conjunction with the Fundación Pedro Meyer, the organisation dedicated to “the reflection, interpretation and investigation of the image and the new media”. It will be held in Mexico City between the 7th and the 11th of December 2015. The 12 photographers joining Masterclass Latin America have been announced; made up of seven men and five women of nine nationalities: Alejandro Kirchuk, Argentina; Dominic Bracco II, USA, based in Mexico; Emilia Lloret, Ecuador; Felipe Dana, Brazil; Jasmine Bakalarz, Argentina; Jonas Wresch, Germany, …


Daily life, or what remains


What Remains, which won 2nd Prize in Daily life, Stories in World Press Photo announced today, is a touching portrait of a Bangladeshi couple struggling with old age. Sarker Protick, their grandson, relies on subtlety, simplicity and visual minimalism to draw the viewer into their realm and elicit sympathy. The outcome comes as an inevitable shock. “I find it intriguing how things change with time in our life – relationships and surroundings as well as how we live on with death, loss, disappearance and all that remains,” says Protick. “By default a photograph stores the past, but it also has the ability to project itself in the future. Somewhere there’s a point where time doesn’t work linearly anymore. Timelessness, that’s the point I want to reach.” Protick didn’t set out to be a photographer but in late 2008, while he was studying for a BA in marketing, his mother gave him a cell phone with a built-in camera. He started taking pictures of anything and everything, especially his friends, and once he graduated, enrolled at Pathshala, the South …


A strong year for portraiture at World Press Photo

Outside of Mads Nissen’s moving image of a gay couple in Russia, which took the overall prize at World Press Photo this year, were several others that sensitively place a person or people centre frame. Acknowledged across the two awards in the Portraits category (singles and stories) were powerful images of Russian women depicted in domestic settings by the late Andy Rocchelli; military academy cadets in Europe by Paolo Verzone; a woman in China – her feet locked to the chair she is sitting on – who has been accused by authorities of working in the illegal sex trade, by Liu Song; and an eight-year-old girl, decadently dressed to go to a Halloween party, in Texas by Lisa Krantz. But it was an image of a little girl in Australia, dressed all in purple, and a project about a community of sex offenders in southern Florida that took the top awards in this category. [bjp_ad_slot] Australian photographer Raphaela Rosella, who featured in BJP‘s June 2014 issue, won first prize in the Portraits, Singles category. In the image, we see a young veiled Aboriginal girl (Laurinda) standing at a bus stop waiting for …


Spot News winner Bulent Kilic on his double win

“I didn’t manage to ask this girl’s name or age because of the clashes, but she must have been around 15-years-old,” says Turkish photographer Bulent Kilic, who has won first and third place in the Spot News singles category at this year’s World Press Photo contest. “There were many high school students there, supporting their friend.” Kilic, a photographer with Agence France-Presse, is talking about the clashes that took place between riot police and protestors after the funeral of Berkin Elvan, a 15-year-old boy who died from injuries he suffered during anti-government protests in Istanbul on 12 March 2014. [bjp_ad_slot] When he heard about the clashes, Kilic, who was in the area, hurried to the scene with two other photographers. He took many images, he says, and worked from 7am until 3am the following morning. But it was for this haunting image of a young wounded girl that he won first prize in the Spot News singles category. Kilic, who was named Photographer of the year 2014 by The Guardian, explains that he saw this girl standing on the street. He was immediately struck by the shock …


Mads Nissen’s Homophobia in Russia wins World Press Photo of the Year

Mads Nissen, a staff photographer for the Danish daily newspaper Politiken, has won the World Press Photo of the Year 2015 for an intimate image of Jon and Alex, two gay men in St Petersburg, Russia. Life for lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) people is becoming increasingly fraught in Russia in the wake of aggressively prohibitive laws for “non-traditional sexual practises.” In the run-up to the Sochi Winter Olympics, Russian President Putin notoriously said of gay citizens in Russia: “One can feel calm and at ease. Just leave kids alone, please.” Sexual minorities face legal and social discrimination, harassment, and even violent hate-crime attacks from conservative religious and nationalistic groups. Nissen, who is represented by Panos Pictures, spent more than a year with gay pride activists groups across Russia as they rallied for their civil liberties under tyrannical new laws and a rising tide of extremist homophobia. The winning picture is part of a larger project by Nissen called Homophobia in Russia, which was shot for Scanpix and selected by the jury of the 58th annual World Press …


BJP Staff