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Emile man of the future © Lucas Blalock

Our pick of the key stories from this week includes a major Tim Walker exhibition coming to London, a new campaign for clean water by Viviane Sassen, and interviews with Lucas Blalock, Youness Miloudi, and Collier Schorr

Viviane Sassen’s campaign for clean water
Worldwide, one in nine people do not have access to clean water. Almost a third live without adequate sanitation facilities. Viviane Sassen collaborates with WaterAid and Giorgio Armani on a new campaign for World Water Day.

© WaterAid/Viviane Sassen

Tim Walker exhibition at V&A, London
Jewelled snuffboxes, miniature Indian paintings, panels of luminous stained glass, and a pair of golden shoes are among the many treasures kept in the V&A that sparked Tim Walker’s imagination while he scoured the museum’s collection of over 2.3m objects. Using these items as a springboard, Walker has produced 10 new photographic projects which will be shown within a major exhibition of his life’s work that opens at the V&A in London this September.

Sarah Grace Wallerstedt. Fashion: Moncler London, 2018 © Tim Walker Studio

Youness Miloudi’s PerseFornia
“I had, like many people, prejudices about Iran,” says Youness Miloudi, whose work focuses on the younger generation of Iran. The French photographer discusses how his preconceptions were challenged, and his documentary project on the youth of Tehran.

From the series PerseFornia © Miloudi Youness

Lucas Blalock’s An Enormous Oar
Shooting meticulously set-up still lifes on film with a large format camera, Lucas Blalock scans his images and digitally manipulates them, creating tricksy, mind-bending work that plays with the boundary between reality and fiction. Sticking his oar into the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, American artist Lucas Blalock’s weird and wonderful images show he’s an artist in his own right.

Hole Foods © Lucas Blalock

Portrait(s) festival returns to Vichy
From the star-studded hills of Hollywood, to Ukraine’s military camps, Russia’s Caucasus region, and the gloomy streets of Thatcher-era England, the programme for this year’s Portrait(s) festival covers a wide breadth of both geography and context, united under the banner of portrait photography. The French photofestival returns to Vichy for its seventh edition this summer, with exhibitions by Philippe Halsman, Tish Murtha, Michal Chelbin, Bastiaan Woudt, Turkina Faso, Benni Valsson, Ambroise Tézenas, and an intriguing show about selfies, curated by Olivier Culmann.

Aleira and Friends, Ukraine 2015 © Michal Chelbin

Any Answers: Collier Schorr
“Personal, commercial, editorial – it’s all the same to me,” says Collier Schorr, whose work explores identity politics and photography’s fetishistic gaze.

Self portrait by Collier Schorr