9 Search Results for: JennyLewis

Three Years Young

“I never imagined I would see those families again,” says Jenny Lewis of the newborns and mothers she photographed in Malawi in 2015. “It was strange leaving there for the first time and not knowing.” Lewis first travelled to Malawi on commission with WaterAid to bring her project One Day Young – a series of portraits of mothers with their one day old babies – to the world’s poorest nation, and to raise awareness of WaterAid’s Deliver Life appeal, which aims to reach 130,000 of families around the world with safe water.   The resulting series of portraits, entitled One Day Young Malawi, shows mothers in rural Malawi celebrating the very first motions of new life. The images are an extension of Lewis’s One Day Young series, which was shot in Hackney, east London across several years. However, the conditions in which these infants were born could not have been more different; their very existence triumphant. Lewis photographed all 10 of the children for One Day Young Malawi in 2015, on the day they were …

2019-05-15T09:02:23+01:00

Female MPs by female photographers – the 209 Women project

“A lot of people have thought of marking the centenary,” says Tracy Marshall, director of development and partnerships at Open Eye Gallery and co-director of Northern Narrative arts initiative. “But they just haven’t managed to do it.”

We’re talking about the 209 Women initiative, in which 209 photographers are taking portraits of the 209 women MPs in the UK parliament. It does seem like a project that was asking to happen, with 2018 marking both 100 years since (some) women got the vote here, and also the year that the first female MP was elected in this country. But, with 418 photographs and politicians to co-ordinate plus many, many other stakeholders and committees, actually achieving it has been quite a feat. What’s seen it through has been teamwork, with the photographer and academic Hilary Wood, who came up with the idea, getting together with hundreds of other women – and men – to make it happen.

“It’s been a huge collaborative effort,” she says. “We had to take it to the Speaker’s Advisory Committee on Works of Art to get it approved, and we then had to ask each MP individually if they wanted to get involved. The fact that they overwhelmingly gave their support shows how relevant this project is. And what I was really pleased about was that we got cross-party support – every single party is involved.”

2018-10-18T13:27:54+01:00

Behind the scenes of an award-winning portrait.

“As a photographer, you are basically only able to create an image of how you see someone rather than maybe what is really there,” says Jenny Lewis, whose portraiture has been published in two books, and whose work was selected for the inaugural Portrait of Britain show

2017-06-21T20:41:40+01:00

Photobook: Jenny Lewis’ Hackney Studios

Hackney has long been celebrated as London’s creative hub, but soaring rent increases are pushing the painters, illustrators, filmmakers, jewellers, ceramicists and fashion designers out of their studios. Jenny Lewis spent four years shooting these creatives in their workspaces and her new book, Hackney Studios, stands as a celebration – and perhaps a commemoration – of a very special time and place. Hackney Studios is published by Hoxton Mini Press, priced £20. www.hoxtonminipress.com  

2017-04-06T13:02:13+01:00

BJP’s Portrait of Britain exhibition to launch across the UK on 1st September

We asked you to show us the modern face of Britain. And while much has happened in the six months since that might challenge our long-held notions about our national identity, the 100 portraits chosen provide a reflection on who we really are, away from the rhetoric of politics and the discourse of division. Envisaged as an exhibition by the people, of the people and for the people, Portrait of Britain was initiated as an open call for photographs that celebrate this country’s unique heritage and diversity. Selected from nearly 4000 entries, the winning portraits capture young and old, reflecting not just the multiformity of British people, but also the myriad of styles and approaches to contemporary photographic portraiture. There is formality and craft in photographs such as Phil Sharp’s profile view of musicians and producer Dave Okumu, which features on our cover. Others are more casual, a moment observed and captured, like Celia Topping’s photograph of her son meeting his newborn brother for the first time. There are portraits that directly refer to the many nuances …

2017-08-31T10:41:11+01:00

Delivering Life: New Mothers in the World’s Poorest Country

When I ask Jenny Lewis to recount her experiences of photographing her most recent project, One Day Young Malawi, I brace myself. Malawi is officially the poorest nation in the world. According to the World Health Organisation, Malawi has the highest fertility rate in the world, with the average woman raising 5.7 children, and “a critical shortage of capacity in institutions implementing development programmes.” Lewis travelled there – in an extension of her viral One Day Young project – to capture the most intimate moments of a mother and newborn arriving home in the first twenty-four hours after birth. The odds on this tale being anything other than bleak seem slim. “I was next to the delivery room when Efrida was giving birth” Lewis tells BJP of one of the first new mothers she photographed. “Twenty minutes later, they needed the delivery room, so they shoved her out and put her in the room I was in, where I was taking a picture of Miriam, who was bleeding very heavily at the time. “So Efrida was bleeding all over the …

2016-02-08T13:04:48+01:00

Jenny Lewis: One Day Young

BJP

You don’t have to look far to find cultural representations of motherhood. The Virgin Mary, with downcast eyes; Heat-era celebrities flaunting impossibly flat, post-baby stomachs. And yet these images all tend to show a particular take: evasive, sanitised, as though to distract from the unseen horror of labour. “Everyone seems to have this fear and anxiety about the birth,” says Jenny Lewis, whose project on new mothers, One Day Young, has just been published by Hoxton Mini Press. The book consists of 40 portraits, selected from 150, of Hackney-based mothers in their homes, within 24 hours of the birth. “After my son was born, I felt this responsibility to tell people I met who were pregnant that it’s going to be OK.” She decided a portrait series could do that job for her. [bjp_ad_slot] “I put leaflets up in hairdressers, chip shops, corner shops, trying to get a varied demographic of people,” she recalls. The leaflets included a link to her website and as soon as she’d shoot a portrait, she’d publish it online so potential subjects could …

2016-02-08T13:07:51+01:00