Author: Anya Lawrence

Ones to Watch 2019: Seunggu Kim

Each year, British Journal of Photography presents its Ones To Watch – a selection of 19 emerging image-makers, chosen from a list of nearly 750 nominations. Collectively, they provide a window into where photography is heading, at least in the eyes of the curators, editors, agents, festival producers and photographers we invited to nominate. Every weekend throughout May, BJP-online is sharing profiles of the 19 photographers, originally published in the magazine. Discover more here. “My work is an expression of the idea of the ‘instant culture’ that you can see in the leisure spaces of Seoul,” says South Korean photographer Seunggu Kim, referencing the intensity of urban living and the clamour of its inhabitants to find pockets for relaxation in a city where there is no time and no space. “The country’s nickname is ‘Dynamic Korea’, the expression that reveals the people’s style of behaviour is ‘pali-pali’ [fast-fast], and the typical keyword for Korea, I think, is ‘efficiency’,” says Kim, who has lived there all his life, completing his master’s at the Korea National University of …

2019-06-06T16:14:35+01:00

Sophie Green: Congregation

“Shared stories bring people together,” says Sophie Green who, over the course of two years, photographed the Aladura Spiritualist African congregations of Southwark in south-east London. Also known as “White Garment” churches, Aladura is a denomination of Christianity predominantly practised by Yoruba Nigerians. Even though the faith has become synonymous with parts of London – Southwark holding the highest concentration of African churches outside the continent – it has been rarely documented. Curious about what glues individuals together as a community, Green asked a passing congregation member if she could accompany her that Sunday. On invitation, the photographer proceeded to “watch the seven-hour service in awe.” “There is a joy and energy in these congregations that I have never witnessed before,” Green explains. “The services are collaborative, and there is a freedom for people to express themselves and their cultural roots.” Such powerful unification over a belief, and the moving shared experience, triggered Green’s desire to document what she had witnessed. As well as honouring faith, these services are a way for the community to …

2019-04-30T11:38:51+01:00

The photography Masters degree shaped by its students

A young boy sits in an armchair. Wearing a woollen cardigan, his hands loosely grip the side of the chair. His expression is neither buoyant nor sad. For all intents and purposes, this is just an ordinary photograph of an ordinary boy, yet the image forms the basis of an academic essay. Written by Benjamin Matthews – a part-time Masters student currently reading Photography: History, Theory, Practice at University of Sussex – the paper investigates the attribution of victimhood to subjects in images where an act of injustice is suggested but not shown. With this context, the significance of the photograph becomes apparent. The image is part of a collection of material held at The Keep archive, and donated by relatives of German-Jewish families who survived the Holocaust. “The photograph is of a young boy who was tragically killed in Auschwitz,” explains Matthews, “but it was taken before he was transported. The image itself does not contain any reference to the young boy’s murder, it was taken as a family photograph, yet its place within …

2019-03-06T09:51:23+01:00

BJP Staff