Author: BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change: Frederick Paxton describes the making of his new project in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. Three photographers were awarded a grant and LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Here, Frederick Paxton explains what compelled him to make the work he did. “People were very open, and very excited to show us what they were doing,” says Frederick Paxton of his new project exploring football in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. “The way I work, it has a very light footprint. So we could rock up at a five-a-side pitch, say hello to a couple of people, ask if they minded us taking pictures, and just hang out.” The project was commissioned as part of the LUMIX Stories for Change initiative, a collaboration with British Journal of Photography that highlights photography’s power in driving positive change. As such, Paxton was conscious of the varying ways that photojournalism can impact its subjects, and committed to …

2020-07-03T17:26:44+01:00

Community and connection in sport, from the Asian Champions League to local 5-a-sides in refugee camps

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. Three photographers were awarded a grant and LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Here, Frederick Paxton explains what compelled him to make the work he did. “It has a universality,” Frederick Paxton describes the beautiful game, the subject of his new body of work ‘PAINTED LINES’ made in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. “Even if you don’t play football, or you have no interest in it, in a lot of cultures globally it has a context, and it has a relationship to those people.” The sport felt well-suited to a project exploring ideas about inclusion and community in a country which is often more frequently reported on as a site of unrest. Paxton has an extensive portfolio of boundary-pushing work across both photography and film, including documentation of the conflict in Ukraine, an exploration of climate change via …

2020-06-19T13:49:58+01:00

LUMIX Stories for Change: Bringing the stories of New Malden’s North Korean defectors to life

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. In August 2019, three photographers were awarded a grant and LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Below Catherine Hyland discusses the making of her project. In many ways it has been the ideal assignment, says Catherine Hyland of her recent LUMIX Stories for Change project, an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. “To be given all this creative freedom and told ‘make what you want’, here’s loads of time and a good amount of money – that doesn’t happen very often.” Over the past year, Hyland has spent time with the North Korean community in New Malden, South London, eating with them, listening to their experiences and sharing in many cultural rituals from traditional dances to Korean instrumental lessons, choir practices, K-pop events and even laughter …

2020-06-18T11:00:10+01:00

LUMIX Stories for Change: Laura Pannack

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. In August 2019, three photographers were awarded a grant and a LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Below Laura Pannack discusses what she has planned. Remember the first time you went clothes shopping? Watched TV? Made friends with someone of the opposite sex? Probably not. But for the growing number of young Israelis taking the dramatic step of leaving the ultra-Orthodox Jewish world in which they’ve been raised, these experiences are completely novel. In a forthcoming project, Laura Pannack follows one of them, a young man named Baruch, as he navigates a new path, unmoored from his Orthodox upbringing into a more modern lifestyle. Pannack’s Stories for Change series builds on an ongoing focus on Jewish life that dates back to her early days as a photographer. “When I moved to Hackney after university, I was really intrigued …

2020-06-18T11:00:28+01:00

Celebrating joy, positivity and resilience with London’s inspirational community of North Korean defectors

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. Three photographers were awarded a grant and LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Here, Catherine Hyland explains what compelled her to make the work she did. After reading Barbara Demick’s acclaimed book Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea some years ago, Catherine Hyland’s interest in the region and its people was set in motion. She began going to talks given by North Korean defectors in London and gradually started to get to know some of the people who have successfully made it out of North Korea to start new lives in the UK. “It’s something you can’t quite get your head around and I’m always quite curious about complicated stories,” says Hyland, whose work often focuses on people’s relationship to the places they inhabit.  When the opportunity arose to pursue a project in collaboration with a …

2020-06-18T11:01:35+01:00

Vivian Maier, the secret photographer

She cradles a Rolleicord camera to her breast, her eyes staring into her reflection. Until recently, the woman behind the camera was unknown, living a quiet life as a nanny in Chicago and dying, alone in a nursing home, in 2009 at the age of 83. When Vivian Maier’s cache of 100,000 images were unearthed, her work was compared with the greats of street photography. A film was made, Finding Vivian Maier, which introduced a new generation to her work. But Maier herself was the draw; who, exactly, was the mysterious French nanny? What drove her relentless imagery, and why did she keep it so resolutely hidden?

Maier was a private but eccentric Mary Poppins-like figure, who spoke with a delicate French trill and was never without her medium format camera. She took thousands of photographs from the 1950s to 70s, but squirrelled them away in a room she forbade anyone to enter. She was poor, and in 2007 her possessions were auctioned off to recoup her debts – her archive of photographs among them. John Maloof, an estate agent and president of his local history society, discovered them at an auction and took a punt, hoping to find images for a book he was writing on the Portage Park area of Chicago. He found nothing relevant, and put the whole lot into storage for two years.

2018-12-11T10:34:22+01:00

Michał Siarek on Alexander the Great and Macedonian national identity

Pasko Kuzman wears four watches because he believes they help him travel through time. He’s an archaeologist who works in an office called Troy, searching for the burial site of Alexander the Great, and other elements of Macedonia’s Classical past.

Kuzman is one of the many characters Michał Siarek met while photographing Alexander, an exploration of Macedonian national identity by way of ‘Skopje 2014’. Set up in 2010 (and originally slated to end in 2014), the Skopje 2014 project hopes to make Skopje a tourist attraction by drawing on its history – Macedonia was once part of Ancient Greece, and shares its name with a Northern Greek province, but is now so far removed from its heritage that its neighbour lobbied for it to be called the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

2018-09-03T12:19:35+01:00

On show at Foam – Senta Simond’s Rayon Vert

“Tu sais qu’est-ce que c’est le rayon vert?” Marie Rivière’s listless character Delphine asks, her legs swinging, in Éric Rohmer’s 1986 film Le Rayon Vert [The Green Ray]. The film – a portrait of its main character’s halting search for summer romance – was based on Jules Verne’s 1882 novel of the same name. While in theory its title refers to an optical phenomenon – in which the appearance of the sun as it rises or falls beyond the horizon creates a brief flash of green, and with it a supposed moment of mental clarity for all those who see it – in reality its subject matter is far more elusive. “I related the ‘rayon vert’ phenomenon to the process of photography – this special and quick moment that happens rarely,” Swiss photographer Senta Simond explains, referring to her project of the same name. Her series, which will be published by Kominek and shown at London’s Webber Gallery soon, adds a new, compelling layer to the meteorological event/Jules Verne/ Éric Rohmer mix of references. Indeed, Simond, a former student of ECAL, University of Art and Design Lausanne, from which she graduated last summer, first encountered the concept via the 1986 film.

2018-11-23T11:52:38+01:00

Photo London: Another Kind of Life explained by Barbican curator Alona Pardo

“They’re all driven by motivations that are both personal and political to a degree, and they are all self-initiated projects,” says curator Alona Pardo of the photographers in the show Another Kind of Life: Photography on the Margins. “Some may have started as commissions, but very early on took on a life of their own. It was interesting to think about the role of the photographer, because often the photographer hides behind the camera as a facade. There is also an interesting subtext of the photographer occupying the position of an outsider within mainstream society. They are there, assertively documenting the world.”

2018-05-16T12:16:00+01:00

Photo London: Léonie Hampton’s Mend at the Italian Cultural Institute

For Léonie Hampton, photography is a tool to connect with the present moment. “I use it to explore the experience of being in a place, and being in that moment in time,” she says. Most recently this approach inspired Mend, her project for the 2017 Rome Commission which will be on show at the Italian Cultural Institute as part of Photo London this week. “Rome is a great place to explore the idea of being in the present,” says Hampton, “because everywhere you go there are layers of time, visually and architecturally”.

2018-05-15T16:11:33+01:00

BJP Staff