Author: Sarah Roberts

Portrait of Humanity 2020 is now open for entries

This year marks the second edition of Portrait of Humanity, an annual international award inviting photographers to share work that captures the many faces of humanity, and to document the universal expressions of life; laughter, courage, moments of reflection, journeys to work, first hellos, last goodbyes, and everything that happens in between. What’s normal to one person might be extraordinary to someone else. After an incredibly successful first year, which welcomed applications from across the globe, the fifty winning images are now embarking on a global tour, stopping at LagosPhoto Festival in Lagos, Nigeria, Louisiana State Museum as part of PhotoNOLA Festival in New Orleans, USA, and Organ Vida International Photography Festival in Zagreb, Croatia. The coming year will be no different, with exhibitions already confirmed at Photoville Festival in New York City, USA, and Capa Center in Budapest, Hungary. Portrait of Humanity is a unique opportunity to exhibit your work at multiple venues around the world. Last year, the winning images captured intimate moments from every continent. In her photograph Surfing Iran, Giulia Frigieri …

2019-10-15T09:49:46+01:00

Kate Phellini is EyeEm Photographer of the Year

Kate Phellini hails from Warsaw, Poland, where she splits her time between photography, graphic design and blues dancing; “a social dance, similar to swing”. Phellini’s interest in blues dancing has given her a physical focus through which she can explore her main interests in photography – non-verbal communication and body language. “It’s led me to engage photography and dance, my two biggest passions,” she explains. Phellini has been named EyeEm Photographer of the Year. Her win means that this year she will become EyeEm’s ambassador, be exhibited alongside the finalists at Berlin Photo Week, and featured in the 2019 EyeEm Awards Magazine. Her other prizes include a membership to British Journal of Photography, more than $3,000 in photography gear, and a Magnum mentorship.  Among the 10 category winners are those occupying the titles of The Architect, The Minimalist, and The Photojournalist. Marlon Villaverde, who won in the latter category, was chosen for his series The Image, which traces a statue of Christ in Lucban, the Philippines. The statue is believed to have been created between …

2019-10-17T09:51:10+01:00

Portrait of Humanity: Meet our three overall winners

As part of the prizes for the inaugural Portrait of Humanity award, three photographers have been given first, second and third place, each receiving a share of a $10,000 award grant, to create a project related to the movement. In first place, and receiving $5,000 is Priscilla Falcón Moeller, whose winning portrait was taken in Regla, a small borough of Havana, Cuba. “When I took the photograph, my project Teddy Bear Dream was in the midst of completion,” she explains. “I had found a community that made me feel at home and connected, we’d spend hours in the local park playing and dreaming.” On one of those days, Falcón saw Orlando resting on the merry-go-round. “His gaze struck my soul, I kneeled and took his portrait,” she says. “After I took it, he did not move and I did not speak. It was powerful.” Falcón Moeller plans to use the grant to complete a project she has been working on for the past two years. “Pain from the Faith explores and gives a voice to …

2019-10-11T15:14:04+01:00

Female in Focus: Buttons For Eyes

Priya Kambli physically manipulates old family photographs and then rephotographs the altered artefacts. In her Female in Focus winning series, she employs a variety of materials, particularly those that are grounded in everyday use. Flour, turmeric, and strips of wallpaper embellish old pictures of her childhood in India. “I re-contextualise these familial associations for my own artistic and creative purposes,” explains Kambli, “But also as a way of embellishing my past and connecting it to the present.”  The photographer is interested in using her own experience of emigration to contribute to the broader cultural debate on migrant narratives. “As significant political forces try to suppress the concerns of those who are perceived as different, the need to present a variety of perspectives is simply more urgent,” says Kambli. “Sharing our stories has a civic and social impact.” While Kambli’s need to decipher and address her family photographs is personal, the work always touches on universal themes, with the potential to start a dialogue about cultural differences and global similarities.  Kambli describes the process of creating …

2019-10-03T13:24:25+01:00

Female in Focus: Cosmic Drive

“Cosmic Drive primarily explores the way humans handle ignorance,” says Katinka Schuett of her Female in Focus winning series, which examines the contradictory spheres of fantasy and hard science. “I am interested in our perceptions of space, and the question of whether or not life can be found in the universe.” Schuett is as concerned with fantasy as she is with facts, merging the two to consider the illusions we create when there is a void of information.  The photographer’s interest in outer space was initially people-driven – she began Cosmic Drive by photographing people who catalogued possible UFO sightings and extraterrestrial phenomena in Germany. “I’m fascinated by humans’ preoccupation with things that are not visible or tangible,” explains Schuett.  Many of her photographs play on clichéd tropes of space travel. In one image, an alien lies on a hospital bed as if undergoing a medical examination, its face an exact replica of aliens in Hollywood films and science fiction books, and in another, an index finger is bright red and lit up, like the …

2019-09-26T16:01:23+01:00

Female in Focus: Meet the winning photographers

This year, British Journal of Photography launched its inaugural Female in Focus award, with an open call inviting female-identifying photographers to submit their work to be part of an exhibition at United Photo Industries Gallery, during Photoville in New York. The aim of the exhibition was to bridge photography’s gender imbalance and to elevate the work and careers of women. The two winning series and 20 winning single images have now been chosen, and the first Female in Focus exhibition will open at United Photo Industries Gallery on 22 October 2019, and run until 15 November 2019. One of the defining features of the exhibition is that there is no strict theme. Each image has been shot through the female gaze, a perspective that rarely frames the images we see. However, beyond that, the photographs vary hugely in style and subject matter, resulting in a diverse exhibition.  Among the winning single images is Nancy Newberry’s photograph, The Sentinels, which has been taken from her series Smoke Bombs and Border Crossings, a contemporary Spaghetti Western staged …

2019-09-24T13:32:04+01:00

Futures 2019: Olgaç Bozalp

Futures, a platform dedicated to emerging photographers, returns to Unseen this year with another crop of fresh talent. The initiative brings together 12 cultural institutions from across Europe to promote upcoming artists. For its contribution, British Journal of Photography is platforming the work of five of its Ones To Watch, including Olgaç Bozalp. Here, we revisit the article published in our Ones To Watch issue in May 2019, written by Charlotte Jansen. Olgaç Bozalp hails from a small, sleepy, conservative town in the centre of Turkey called Konya. With not much to do, aside from escape to the metropolis of Istanbul for entertainment, a restless Bozalp started to create his own fun. “I was always bored in my home town so I started creating these characters for myself,” he explains. “In retrospect, even though I wanted to get away from home, it has actually played a big role as inspiration for my work. My relatives, their homes, the decor – I wanted to recreate those environments in my photographs.” Bozalp eventually left Turkey to study theatre at university …

2019-09-04T16:14:00+01:00

Futures 2019: Raphaël Barontini

Futures, a platform dedicated to emerging photographers, returns to Unseen this year with another crop of fresh talent. The initiative brings together 12 cultural institutions from across Europe to promote upcoming artists. For its contribution, British Journal of Photography is platforming the work of five of its Ones To Watch, including Raphaël Barontini. Here, we revisit the article published in our Ones To Watch issue in May 2019, written by Marc Feustel. The title of his 2018 solo exhibition in Istanbul, Tapestry from an Asteroid, evokes the breadth of influences and otherworldly quality of French artist Raphaël Barontini’s work. His assemblages combine icons of classical painting with photographic fragments, silkscreened images with digital printing, and monochrome images with bold splashes of colour, all of which is layered onto owing textiles. The images he creates in this way draw as much from the canon of art history as they do from a hallucinatory, fantasised and poetic future. While Barontini is not primarily a photographer, his works always integrate photographic elements. “Photography is a constant and indispensable part of my …

2019-09-04T16:03:30+01:00

Futures 2019: Mous Lamrabat

Futures, a platform dedicated to emerging photographers, returns to Unseen this year with another crop of fresh talent. The initiative brings together 12 cultural institutions from across Europe to promote upcoming artists. For its contribution, British Journal of Photography is platforming the work of five of its Ones To Watch, including Mous Lamrabat. Here, we revisit the article published in our Ones To Watch issue in May 2019, written by Maisie Skidmore. Mous Lamrabat has an unwavering faith in the power of intuition. If it wasn’t for his gut instinct, he might have begun his career at an esteemed architecture practice upon finishing his studies in interior design at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent, as he had intended to, and never have turned to photography at all. “They asked, ‘Can you come in and sign the papers on Monday?’ But the whole weekend, I felt unsettled,” he remembers. When Monday morning came, Lamrabat called to politely decline the job offer, and reoriented the creative process he had developed over years of study to create images …

2019-09-04T16:03:47+01:00

BJP Staff