All posts filed under: BJP magazine

Ones to Watch 2019: Raphaël Barontini

Each year, British Journal of Photography presents its Ones To Watch – a selection of 19 emerging image-makers, chosen from a list of nearly 750 nominations. Collectively, they provide a window into where photography is heading, at least in the eyes of the curators, editors, agents, festival producers and photographers we invited to nominate. Every weekend throughout May, BJP-online is sharing profiles of the 19 photographers, originally published in the magazine. Discover more here. The title of his 2018 solo exhibition in Istanbul, Tapestry from an Asteroid, evokes the breadth of influences and otherworldly quality of French artist Raphaël Barontini’s work. His assemblages combine icons of classical painting with photographic fragments, silkscreened images with digital printing, and monochrome images with bold splashes of colour, all of which is layered onto owing textiles. The images he creates in this way draw as much from the canon of art history as they do from a hallucinatory, fantasised and poetic future. While Barontini is not primarily a photographer, his works always integrate photographic elements. “Photography is a constant and …

2019-05-11T11:16:10+01:00

Ones to Watch 2019: Aishwarya Arumbakkam

Each year, British Journal of Photography presents its Ones To Watch – a selection of 19 emerging image-makers, chosen from a list of nearly 750 nominations. Collectively, they provide a window into where photography is heading, at least in the eyes of the curators, editors, agents, festival producers and photographers we invited to nominate. Every weekend throughout May, BJP-online is sharing profiles of the 19 photographers, originally published in the magazine. Discover more here. A visual poem. A modern interpretation of mythologies. A record of human greed and loss. Each of these expressions could be used to describe Aishwarya Arumbakkam’s work, ka Dingiei, which considers the reverberations of mining near the Khasi community of Lama Punji in Bangladesh. But on their own, they would not do it justice. The mostly staged ethereal black-and-white photographs take us on “a journey across time and space in which mythology and the otherworldly converge with the everyday, in order to understand the power of the social documentary as art and activism,” describes Rahaab Allana, curator of the Alkazi Foundation for …

2019-05-14T10:47:50+01:00

Ones to Watch 2019: Valentine Bo

Each year, British Journal of Photography presents its Ones To Watch – a selection of 19 emerging image-makers, chosen from a list of nearly 750 nominations. Collectively, they provide a window into where photography is heading, at least in the eyes of the curators, editors, agents, festival producers and photographers we invited to nominate. Every weekend throughout May, BJP-online is sharing profiles of the 19 photographers, originally published in the magazine. Discover more here. A tiny, naked newborn floats in a pale red liquid, suspended at the top of a test tube, clamped and attached to a condenser of sorts. It is a stressful image, but the baby in the test tube is, in fact, sculpted from polymer clay and painted with acrylic paint to imitate the pigment of human skin, in water dyed with food colouring. “I like how the image doesn’t look literal,” says photographer and artist, Valentine Bo. “It develops a sense of duality and raises more questions than it does answers.” This is true of many of the Ukrainian’s photographs from …

2019-05-10T13:17:27+01:00

Any Answers: Arwed Messmer

In RAF – No Evidence, shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize, Arwed Messmer examines the rise of the Baader-Meinhof Group, from student protests to the cataclysmic events of the ‘German Autumn’ of 1977, using state archives as his source material. Employing a similar methodology, previous works have focused on police surveillance (Berlin, 1966-70), a famous kidnap (Cell), and failed escapes from the GDR (Reenactment MfS) – all exploring recent events to “create new ways of reading images” as historical documents. In this Any Answers, originally published in issue #7882 of British Journal of Photography magazine, Messmer considers his practice in context of his country’s history – I was an avid teenage trainspotter. I needed photography to ‘collect’ and document all the locomotives. My entry point was very functional at first, and it was only later that I developed an artistic interest in the medium. But I was producing the same kind of images that I focus on today. Without that intensive period, I’d probably have a different focus. Travelling through East and West …

2019-05-09T11:59:04+01:00

BJP Staff