All posts filed under: Picture gallery

Birgit Jürgenssen. Ich Bin

Birgit Jürgenssen belongs to a circle of Austrian women artists who were prominent in the 1970s for work that explored gender identity and the reclamation of the female body. Inspired by the work of Louise Bourgeois and Meret Oppenheim, Jürgenssen helped create a space for sharp feminist commentary, in opposition to the male Viennese Actionist movement that was dominant at the time. She is now remembered as one of the leading figures of the Austrian avant-garde. In the latest edition of an exhibition series, the Copenhagen-based Louisiana Museum of Modern Art is bringing Jürgenssen’s photographs and drawings to the fore. Born in Vienna in 1949, Jürgenssen died prematurely at the age of 54. Although her work received scant attention during her lifetime, in recent years, Jürgenssen has garnered significant posthumous recognition, drawing support for her humorous compositions that focus on the destruction of rigid gender roles and freedom of choice. Rebelliousness runs as a thread throughout her extensive works, interrogating the notion of normalcy and traditional gender constructs. In one piece, entitled Housewives’ Kitchen Apron, …

2019-06-13T15:32:02+01:00

The unseen work of Werner Bischof

Cola and cigarette advertisements, a man scaling San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, the fuzzy bright lights of Broadway. This is some of the iconography that makes up Werner Bischof’s collection of colour photographs from early 1950s America. Alongside them are images of everyday life; the shadow of a tree on a brick building, a car in snowfall, and workmen constructing a highway bridge in California. The work is going on show for the first time, in an exhibition devoted to his USA series at David Hill Gallery. Bischof was the first non-founding member to be welcomed into the then-fledgling Magnum collective, in 1949 joining Robert Capa, David  Seymour, Henri Cartier-Bresson and George Rodger. He had already become recognised for his pioneering use of colour photography, and was one of the first documentary photographers to take the format seriously. At the time of joining Magnum, most of Bischof’s contemporaries still predominantly worked in monochrome, a trend that continued well into the 1960s. USA is a series of work that brings early 1950s America vividly to life, …

2019-06-07T09:56:44+01:00

Photography on a Postcard 2019

Debuting last year at Photo London, Photography on a Postcard offered the chance to own a signed, one-off print by a world-renowned photographer for as little as £55. The twist was that all photographers would remain anonymous until after the auction, when buyers found out which print they had won – a lucky dip of sorts. Now back at the fair for its second year, buyers have the chance to bid on a specific photograph. All photographers still remain anonymous until after the auction, and all bids begin at the same price. The aim is to democratise Photo London by placing photographers of various stages in their career on an equal playing field. There are over 550 prints to choose from, which include those by some of photography’s biggest names – from Larry Clark, Janet Delaney and Eamonn Doyle, to Roger Ballen and Michael Wolf. Bidding starts on 08 May, and runs until 22 May, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to The Hepatitis C Trust and its campaign to eliminate the virus by …

2019-05-09T09:51:02+01:00

Palm* Photo Prize 2019 announces its shortlist

London-based photography publisher Palm* Studios has announced the 100 artists shortlisted for its 2019 Palm* Photo Prize. Selected from almost 4,000 entries, the shortlisted mages will be  exhibited at theprintspace gallery in east London between 14 and 17 May as a satellite event to this year’s Photo London fair. On the opening night of the exhibition, the public are invited to vote for the photograph they think is most deserving of winning the prize. The photographer with the highest number of votes will go on to win the People’s Choice award. First and second place awards will be presented to two photographers selected by a judging panel that comprises Karen McQuaid, senior curator at The Photographers’ Gallery; Sarah Allen, assistant curator at Tate Modern; Jessica Lopez, photo editor at Polaroid Originals; and writer and curator David Campany. The open call specified no set theme and photographers were asked to submit no more than two standalone images. Photographers took part from all over the world, with images encompassing a vast array of styles and disciplines. Among …

2019-05-07T16:45:31+01:00

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Han Nguyen’s Nude Compositions

There is no single formula that guides the practice of Han Nguyen; visual stimuli and, sometimes, instinct shape his work. For Nude Compositions, a selection of which are on show at Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, California, from 02 May to 14 June, the photographer co-opts the pictorial language of Cubism. Nude forms, rendered in black-and-white and fragmented by layered planes, melt into related shapes and tones – shreds of Cubist paintings; abstract shapes; greys, whites, and blacks.  Many of the fractured torsos belong to models who the photographer captured years before; others were re-photographed from books and movies; a few are self-portraits. In 1996, Nguyen began to carve up negatives and reassemble them using Scotch tape. The results, which he refers to as “collage negatives,” were then blown up with an enlarger. “I was trying to create images that resemble assemblages or collage,” Nguyen explains, “… at the time I thought it was a good idea and it had never been done before.” Nguyen moved to the US from Vietnam in 1975 and settled …

2019-05-07T15:04:06+01:00

A hedonistic portrait of Andy Warhol’s New York party scene

Between 1971 and 1983, Bob Colacello served as editor of Andy Warhol’s Interview Magazine; a physical incarnation of New York City’s cultural renaissance. Often armed with nothing but his miniature Minox 35 EL camera, Colacello became a fixture of Warhol’s New York party scene, documenting some of the most significant figures of the time in their most off-guard moments. On 03 May, 150 of Colacello’s photographs – many of which have never been exhibited before – will go on show at Vito Schnabel Projects in New York. Encompassing portraits taken in iconic locations including Studio 54 and Regine’s, and featuring portraits of Warhol and other icons, Pictures from Another Time documents a world in the midst of social change: “It was a world where classifications and categories seemed to fall by the wayside,” says Ingrid Sischy, Colacello’s successor at Interview Magazine. “Where black and white, gay and straight, traditional society and new society, uptown and downtown, the powerful and the powerless, and young and old, all danced under the same disco ball.” Alongside hedonistic images …

2019-04-30T15:37:34+01:00

Florence Henri: Reflecting Bauhaus

Born in New York in 1893, Florence Henri left the city when she was two years old after the death of her mother. She was thrown into a peripatetic life, travelling between her mother’s relatives in Silesia (then part of Germany), a convent school in Paris, and family homes in London and the Isle of Wight, and as an adult continued her travels, studying music in Rome, relocating to Berlin in World War One, acquiring Swiss citizenship through a hasty marriage, and moving to Paris in 1925, where she studied painting under Fernand Leger. 

In 1927, when she was 34, Henri enrolled as a non-matriculating student at the Bauhaus in Dessau, where she studied photography with László Moholy-Nagy and struck up a close friendship with Lucia Moholy. Between 1928 and the late 1930s she created the photography she’s now best-known for, using prisms and reflections to complicate her images and experimenting with techniques such as photomontage, multiple exposures and photograms.

2019-04-30T10:00:35+01:00

BJP Staff