All posts tagged: Algeria

Tomasz Laczny on “helping refugees spread their forgotten stories”

Tomasz Laczny’s work is rough and striking – striking enough to have caught the tutors’ eyes at the BJP x Magnum Photos workshop on Storytelling, Collaboration and Advocacy earlier this year. The workshop was a theme close to Laczny’s heart because he’s both shot refugees and helped them depict their own lives, and because his preferred medium is the photobook. His project 40/place which does not exist was shot in a refugee camp in Dakhla, Algeria, and looks at the Saharawi, “exiled people living in the Sahara desert and waiting 40 years to go back home”. The resulting book, which he brought to the workshop, juxtaposes shots showing the harsh reality of daily life in the camps with satellite photos showing their isolated position in the desert, “to highlight the fragile existence of the people suspended in this non-place”. It received an honourable mention at the Dummy Award Kassel 2016. While working on 40/place which does not exist Laczny decided to run a photographic workshop for young people living in the camps, “to help them to spread to the world their forgotten story”. …

2017-04-10T11:42:59+00:00

Frantz Fanon’s psychology of race, in photographs

In 2015, the cross-pollination of races occurs freely and globally. Yet it is easy to overlook the complex process of identification that a mixed-race person must confront. For in each race’s DNA is a history, culture and psychology that are all too-often defined in isolation. In his most recent series, Frantz Fanon, which tracks the life of the iconic 20th century thinker, Bruno Boudjelal has continued his career tradition of using photography to untangle the rich web of his own mixed identity. Frantz Fanon is widely regarded as the definitive post-colonial theorist. Born in Martinique, he traveled to France to fight in the Second World War before settling in North Africa, working as a psychiatrist in a small town, Blida, 50 miles from the Algerian capital. It was here, in the years leading up to both its release and Fanon’s death in 1961, that he wrote his chilling account of the psychological effects of colonialism and decolonization on the native Algerian population, Les Damnés de la Terre – ‘The Wretched of the Earth.’   “For …

2015-11-05T19:31:02+00:00

BJP Staff