All posts tagged: Football

LUMIX Stories for Change: Frederick Paxton describes the making of his new project in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. Three photographers were awarded a grant and LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Here, Frederick Paxton explains what compelled him to make the work he did. “People were very open, and very excited to show us what they were doing,” says Frederick Paxton of his new project exploring football in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. “The way I work, it has a very light footprint. So we could rock up at a five-a-side pitch, say hello to a couple of people, ask if they minded us taking pictures, and just hang out.” The project was commissioned as part of the LUMIX Stories for Change initiative, a collaboration with British Journal of Photography that highlights photography’s power in driving positive change. As such, Paxton was conscious of the varying ways that photojournalism can impact its subjects, and committed to …

2020-07-16T19:06:17+01:00

Community and connection in sport, from the Asian Champions League to local 5-a-sides in refugee camps

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. Three photographers were awarded a grant and LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Here, Frederick Paxton explains what compelled him to make the work he did. “It has a universality,” Frederick Paxton describes the beautiful game, the subject of his new body of work ‘PAINTED LINES’ made in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. “Even if you don’t play football, or you have no interest in it, in a lot of cultures globally it has a context, and it has a relationship to those people.” The sport felt well-suited to a project exploring ideas about inclusion and community in a country which is often more frequently reported on as a site of unrest. Paxton has an extensive portfolio of boundary-pushing work across both photography and film, including documentation of the conflict in Ukraine, an exploration of climate change via …

2020-07-16T19:07:47+01:00

Women’s football: Taking up space

Alice Mann was selected for the adidas Breaking Barriers commission. Organised by Studio 1854 in collaboration with adidas, the project awarded Mann £10,000 to create a new body of work. Below, a handful of the players who Mann photographed reflect on the personal importance of football, together with the challenges that come with playing a sport often associated with men. The 2019 Women’s World Cup felt remarkably different to previous iterations. In the UK, the BBC committed to broadcasting every game on national television. Broadcasters around the world followed suit. Almost 59 million people watched Brazil play France, making it the most viewed women’s football match of all time. In the UK, audience figures totalled 28.1 million, amounting to 47 per cent of the television-watching UK population, while, in Holland, 88 per cent of Dutch television viewers watched the final. This was the country’s largest television audience since the men’s World Cup semi-final in 2014.  The impact of this should not be underestimated. With such a presence in the media, women’s football entered the mainstream. The …

2019-09-28T17:05:41+01:00

Iceland – the smallest-ever country in the World Cup

For a country with a population of only 340,000 – more or less equal to the London Borough of Ealing – qualifying for this year’s Fifa World Cup was a miracle. It is the smallest-ever country to participate, and in its first match, it managed to hold Argentina to a 1-1 draw. 99.6% of Iceland’s TV viewers tuned in to watch the game, making it the most-viewed sporting event in the country’s history. 

“They really are crazy about football,” says Matteo de Mayda, an Italian photographer who travelled to Iceland with journalist Cosimo Bizzarri earlier this year to document the sport in Iceland. “It’s a miracle for them to be at the World Cup, and a miracle to draw against Argentina.”

2018-06-22T09:22:19+01:00

Shoot Ball, Not Gun

Earlier this year, Sebastian Gil Miranda won First Place in the Campaign category at the Sony World Photography Awards 2015 for his project Shoot Ball, Not Gun. The documentary project took place on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, where he visited one of the most dangerous slums in Argentina where two rival gangs violently struggle for turf and power. Focusing on the town’s children, he photographed them playing football within the courtyard of the Chapel Our Lady of Luján. The children, for whom hearing indiscriminate gunshots at night is common place, are connected to these gangs, with fathers, brothers and family friends caught up in the bloodshed. With entries to the 2016 edition of the Sony World Photography Awards closing soon, we caught up with Miranda to discuss the project.     What’s the genesis of the project? Usually I work helping NGOs and social foundations. In this case, I knew that Uniendo Caminos, a foundation dedicated to educational support for children in various slums of Buenos Aires, needed content to offer workshops in a centre that …

2015-11-24T17:12:40+01:00

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