All posts tagged: Here Press

Shortlist announced for the Paris Photo/Aperture Foundation Photobook Awards

Laia Abril, Nina Berman, Sohrab Hura, and Carmen Winant are all in the running for the prestigious Paris Photo/Aperture Foundation Photobook of the Year Award, which will be announced on 09 November at Paris Photo. 

In total ten books have been shortlisted for the award; in addition, 20 books have been shortlisted for the First Photobook, and five for the Photography Catalogue of the Year. All the shortlisted books will go on show at Paris Photo and at the Aperture Foundation in New York, then tour to various venues across Europe, as well as being featured in the Autumn 2018 issue of The Photobook Review. In addition the Photobook of the Year winner will receive $10,000. 

2018-11-02T10:24:23+00:00

New Zealand’s Mongrel Mob gang, photographed by Jono Rotman

Arresting. Exquisite. Gripping. Chilling. Disgraceful. Unacceptable. These are all words people have used to describe portraits made by Jono Rotman. Created over the last decade, his project Mongrelism presents an intimate look at members of the Mongrel Mob – New Zealand’s largest, most notorious gang. Though he is looking at a subculture as an outsider – a domain regularly mined by photojournalists – Rotman eschews a traditional documentarian approach to his subject matter. In so doing, the project’s scope extends beyond the Mob itself to touch upon issues related to New Zealand’s charged colonial past and self-professed biculturalism, the politics and ethics of portraiture, and the intersections of seemingly disparate human experience.

The New Zealand-born photographer explains that since childhood, “I always felt certain violent and uneasy forces within my country”. In Lockups (1999-2005), Rotman photographed the interiors of prisons and psychiatric hospitals throughout New Zealand, exploring the medium’s ability to convey the fraught “psychic climate” embedded in these state-controlled institutions. The works are eerily devoid of people, a deliberate decision made, says Rotman, “because I wanted to encourage a direct, personal interaction with the spaces. With prisons, for example, as soon as you introduce people into the picture, it becomes easy to think, ‘Here’s the storyline: this place is for those sorts of people. And I can fit it all into my established worldview’.”

2018-11-05T12:20:53+00:00

Edmund Clark’s immersive study of prison life goes on show at the Ikon Gallery

“I hate myself because I am a murderer… You can’t save me… We are a faceless, forgotten part of society…” These are just some of the intimate, often devastating thoughts of the inmates at HMP Grendon, a category B men’s facility in Buckinghamshire and Europe’s only “wholly therapeutic” prison. Their words accompany My Shadow’s Reflection, a series informed by Edmund Clark’s artist-in-residence at Grendon, which forms part of his larger body of work, In Place of Hate, on show at Ikon Gallery in Birmingham from 06 December.

2017-12-01T19:59:56+00:00

Jack Latham wins the second edition of the Bar-Tur Photobook Award

Welsh photographer Jack Latham has won the Bar-Tur Photobook Award, for his project Sugar Paper Theories. Latham will work with The Photographers’ Gallery and Here Press to produce his first photobook, a prize worth £20,000.   The winning project traces an infamous true crime case in Iceland. Known as the Reykjavik Confessions, it involved the testimonies of six people, who confessed to two murders they had no apparent memory of. Latham employed a mix of archival images, ephemera and his own photographs to convey the sinister ambience of a horrific, yet hazy collective memory. Latham tells BJP, “the Bar-Tur Award will really enable us to be as ambitious with the project as possible. The case itself is so complicated and trying to retell it through photographs alone wouldn’t be enough. I’m working with writer Sofia Kathryn Smith and now, continuing the project with a book in mind means we’re able to collaborate fully in a symbiotic way. Working with an exciting publisher like Here Press goes hand and hand with the work, it’s different and hopefully the book will reflect …

2015-12-02T15:19:39+00:00

The art of perfect coverage

A retired electrical engineer from London started to publish images of himself  ‘fully veiled’ on Flickr, wearing clothes found across the Muslim world, hoodies, headscarfs and more. “This new idea translates the idea of perfect coverage as understood in Afghanistan and Pakistan to the English high street, for anyone who enjoys anonymity, luxury and a sense of drama,” he writes. “It’s easy; all it needs is a sense of adventure and courage.” A selection of these images have now been published by Here Press, the small publishing house behind Edmund Clark’s Control Order House, David Moore’s Pictures from the Real World, Ben Roberts’ Occupied Spaces and Seba Kurtis’ Drowned. Working with the anonymous gentlemen behind the veil, they have produced a slim but thought-provoking book, 2041 – named after the author’s online identity. The book features a small selection of the 60,000+ images the author has made of himself – or maybe other people – swathed in fabric, and was a collaboration between 2041 and two editors, Lewis Chaplin and Ben Weaver. BJP asked Chaplin more about the project. [bjp_ad_slot] BJP: How did you come across …

2015-04-17T14:15:10+00:00

BJP Staff