All posts tagged: Magnum Photos

The unseen work of Werner Bischof

Cola and cigarette advertisements, a man scaling San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, the fuzzy bright lights of Broadway. This is some of the iconography that makes up Werner Bischof’s collection of colour photographs from early 1950s America. Alongside them are images of everyday life; the shadow of a tree on a brick building, a car in snowfall, and workmen constructing a highway bridge in California. The work is going on show for the first time, in an exhibition devoted to his USA series at David Hill Gallery. Bischof was the first non-founding member to be welcomed into the then-fledgling Magnum collective, in 1949 joining Robert Capa, David  Seymour, Henri Cartier-Bresson and George Rodger. He had already become recognised for his pioneering use of colour photography, and was one of the first documentary photographers to take the format seriously. At the time of joining Magnum, most of Bischof’s contemporaries still predominantly worked in monochrome, a trend that continued well into the 1960s. USA is a series of work that brings early 1950s America vividly to life, …

2019-06-07T09:56:44+00:00

Meet Hakan Kalkan, our Portrait of Humanity People’s Choice Winner

Hakan Kalkan has been featured as one of The Guardian Editor’s Picks of the best Portrait of Humanity entries so far, but it took a while for him to discover his aptitude for portraiture. The Istanbul-based Turkish / British photographer nurtured an amateur interest in photography alongside a career in finance, but he initially focussed on landscapes. Gradually, his interest shifted to portraiture, and he now uses his camera to tell people’s stories. The image that our British Journal of Photography followers voted as their favourite of The Guardian Editor’s Picks show a young Turkish boy tending to the rams on his family’s farm. It’s bright and busy, and a perfect example of what Kalkan calls ‘capturing the soul of moment’. We spoke to Kalkan about the story behind the picture, and what being part of Portrait of Humanity would mean to him. Can you tell me about the photograph you entered into Portrait of Humanity? What is the story behind it? Turkey is a large and diverse country, and I’ve been trying to capture …

2019-10-21T15:18:57+00:00

Meet Fabiana Nunes, our Portrait of Humanity People’s Choice Winner

Fabiana Nunes is a Brazilian photographer based in Zurich, Switzerland. Having worked in the fashion industry for years, she frequently jets off to glamorous locations (including Paris, London, and New York) to cover industry parties as well as concerts, festivals and nightlife. Her favourite subject, however, is everyday life. The image that The Guardian editors picked as one of their favourite Portrait of Humanity entries shows a mother and child collecting shells on a Tanzanian beach. Though a daily routine for the subjects, it was an unusual scene for Nunes, who spends most of her days in hectic European cities. This encapsulates Portrait of Humanity’s motto: what’s ordinary to you may be extraordinary to someone else. We spoke to Nunes about the story behind the picture, and what being part of Portrait of Humanity would mean to her. What are your key interests as a photographer? I have always dreamed of visiting the places I’ve seen in pictures. My favourite subject is the diversity that I find while travelling around the globe. For me, photography …

2019-10-21T14:50:00+00:00

Meet Leander Varekamp, our Portrait of Humanity People’s Choice Winner

Portrait of Humanity provides photographers with the chance to share portraits of everyday life around the world, with the world. The aim is to explore and celebrate the many faces of humanity. That’s also the aim of Holland-based documentary photographer Leander Varekamp, whose image was selected by The Guardian editors as one of their favourite Portrait of Humanity entries so far, and voted by our followers as their favourite of the picks. The image, a crisp black & white portrait, is part of a series on Burrneshas – Albanian women who have chosen to live their lives as men. With only a few dozen Burrneshas left, the tradition is quickly dying out, and Varekamp is using portraiture to ensure that this little-known phenomenon is not forgotten completely. Since Varekamp discovered a talent for photography at the age of 17, he has used his camera as a means of investigating communities – such as Burrneshas – that intrigue him. As he puts it, ‘the camera opens doors that would otherwise remain closed’. We spoke to Varekamp …

2019-10-21T15:18:05+00:00

Meet Portrait of Humanity’s global judges and ambassadors

Portrait of Humanity is a unique photography award. Seeking images that capture life across the globe, it has a singular mission at its core: to unite the global community through the power of photography. By inviting images that capture shared human experiences – be it laughter, joy or love – we hope to prove that there is more that unites us than sets us apart. 1854 Media, publisher of British Journal of Photography, and Magnum Photos, the two teams behind the award, have welcomed photography leaders from countries across the globe to act as judges and ambassadors. We’ve brought together a selection of inspiring people – including photographers, curators, editors, and gallery directors – who represent a cross-section of the photography world. The judging panel will be tasked with choosing the 50 winning images that will tour the world in 2019/ 2020, and the 200 shortlisted images to go in the Portrait of Humanity book, published by Hoxton Mini Press and distributed worldwide. Among them is Sarah Leen, the current and first female Director of …

2019-10-08T13:57:03+00:00

Portrait of Humanity: The Guardian’s David Levene on capturing the city

David Levene has spent many years photographing for The Guardian, and in particular for their EyeWitness series, which he cites as some of his best work. Beyond The Guardian, Levene has undertaken a great number of projects for charities, photographing the unique challenges, but also the similarities, of people around the world. His interest in that which connects us makes Levene the perfect ambassador for Portrait of Humanity, a project seeking to prove that there is more that unites us than sets us apart. David Levene’s book City combines over 14 years of work shot across 62 different cities, from the suburban banality of Walthamstow, London, to the congested streets of Tokyo’s Shibuya crossing, and the homeless camps of San Francisco. The book provides a startling glimpse into the diverse forms of urbanity that exist around the world. With more than half of the world’s population now living in cities, Levene’s photographs tell a powerful story of people, place, and modern life. City is set to be re-released soon as a revised edition, with a …

2019-10-21T15:03:14+00:00

Meet Hossein Fardinfard, our Portrait of Humanity People’s Choice Winner

Our followers voted Iranian photographer Hossein Fardinfard’s image as their favourite of the recent Guardian Editor’s Pick gallery of the best Portrait of Humanity entries so far. Taken in Tbilisi, the image depicts a scene from a national holiday in Georgia, with girls dressed in traditional costume. It captures a moment of togetherness and community, values at the heart of Portrait of Humanity. Fardinfard, now based in the Netherlands, found photography via an unconventional route. Having studied cartography, Geomorphology and IT, he pursued a career as a web developer before discovering his aptitude for the art form at the age of 30. Initially interested in street photography, his focus eventually shifted onto documentary photography and portraiture. He’s currently undertaking photography research at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, Holland. What are your key interests as a photographer? Social observation, human rights, and identity. I’m currently working on some long-term projects, like the Post-Soviet Generation project I’m doing in Georgia, which is about changes that the collapse of the Soviet Union has spelled for …

2019-10-08T13:45:00+00:00

Shahidul Alam’s images on show in London

Acclaimed Bangladeshi photographer Shahidul Alam hit the headlines for all the wrong reasons this autumn, when he was arrested in Dhaka on 05 August for making “provocative comments” following widespread protests against government corruption. After over 100 days in jail he’s now been freed on bail, and back in the media for his images – which is now on show in London. He’s included in the third FIX Photo Festival, which is open until 01 December in London, and also includes work by Magnum Photos’ Chris Steele-Perkins, Zaklina Anderson, Robert Clayton, Christian Nilson, Mercedes Parodi, Helen Petersen, Einar Sira, Chloe Rosser, and more, plus a symposium on women in photography. 

2018-11-29T10:25:55+00:00

Portrait of Humanity: Meet our The Guardian Editors’ Pick People’s Choice Winner, Toby A. Cox

For Toby A. Cox, one of our first Portrait of Humanity People’s Choice Winners, photography and travel are inseparable. Having grown up in the US, she only started taking pictures when she travelled as a student. Since then, she has come to use photography as a way of exploring different cultures. The Guardian editors picked her image, which captures two young children waving through a car window, as one of the best Portrait of Humanity entries so far. The picture, taken in Kyrgyzstan, captures a moment of joy. Cox has made it her mission to confront rising Islamophobia by documenting day-to-day life in Muslim-majority countries, tackling what she sees as an ‘us vs them’ mentality. Her photographs show that regardless of race or religion, we all experience the same emotions – making us far more similar than we might think. Can you tell me about your background as a photographer? How and when did you first get into photography? I took photos when I started travelling, but mostly of landscapes and things, not people. Until …

2019-10-21T15:01:49+00:00

Portrait of Humanity: Meet our The Guardian Editors’ Pick People’s Choice Winner, Anna Mia Davidson

US-based photographer Anna Mia Davidson was voted as our People’s Choice Winner, after The Guardian editors picked her image as one of the best Portrait of Humanity entries so far. The image shows a farmer and her grandson harvesting flowers. Bright and rich with colour, the portrait celebrates its subjects. As with many of Davidson’s portraits, the image captures a bond – in this case, between grandmother and grandson. Family is where photography began for Davidson, whose father – a professional photographer – encouraged her interest in the medium from an early age. Davidson has published two photobooks, Cuba Black And White, an eight-year project focusing on life in Cuba during the United States’ embargo, and Human Nature: Sustainable Farming in the Pacific Northwest, a multi-year portrait project about the people behind the sustainable farming movement. Davidson’s chosen topics tend to be weighty and complex, but her photographs are optimistic, and the resounding message of her work is that crisis can be overcome by the power of community. Can you tell me about your background …

2019-10-21T15:01:24+00:00

BJP Staff