All posts tagged: Studio 1854

christopher-bethell-dukeofearl-07

The Duke of Earl

Christopher Bethell crisscrossed the United States in an attempt to understand his own relationship to the country, and the history of his Grandfather. The resulting photographic series was awarded the Under 30’s Gold Award in the Royal Photographic Society’s International Photography Exhibition 2018Christopher Bethell crisscrossed the United States in an attempt to understand his own relationship to the country, and the history of his Grandfather. The resulting photographic series was awarded the Under 30’s Gold Award in the Royal Photographic Society’s International Photography Exhibition 2018

2019-07-08T11:58:04+00:00

Get inspired, get seen and get paid with our new 1854 Access membership

We are delighted to unveil our new memberships platform, 1854 Access. For the first time, photography lovers will have the opportunity to become fully involved with every aspect of 1854 Media. With benefits spanning our editorial, awards and commercial platforms, 1854 Access is an essential tool for anyone who is serious about photography. Members can choose between Full Access or Digital Access memberships. The former includes a print subscription to British Journal of Photography, the world’s longest-established and leading authority on contemporary photography. Full Access members will receive our beautifully crafted and multi award-winning magazine delivered to their door every month, and each edition will come with an exclusive, collectable cover – a perk just for our members and subscribers. Both Full Access and Digital Access members can also enjoy an ad-free digital subscription to British Journal of Photography, meaning they can get the latest stories on their mobile or tablet, on the go. This includes more than five years of back issues from the archive, so members can start building their collection right away. …

2019-07-12T14:29:00+00:00

The photography Masters degree shaped by its students

A young boy sits in an armchair. Wearing a woollen cardigan, his hands loosely grip the side of the chair. His expression is neither buoyant nor sad. For all intents and purposes, this is just an ordinary photograph of an ordinary boy, yet the image forms the basis of an academic essay. Written by Benjamin Matthews – a part-time Masters student currently reading Photography: History, Theory, Practice at University of Sussex – the paper investigates the attribution of victimhood to subjects in images where an act of injustice is suggested but not shown. With this context, the significance of the photograph becomes apparent. The image is part of a collection of material held at The Keep archive, and donated by relatives of German-Jewish families who survived the Holocaust. “The photograph is of a young boy who was tragically killed in Auschwitz,” explains Matthews, “but it was taken before he was transported. The image itself does not contain any reference to the young boy’s murder, it was taken as a family photograph, yet its place within …

2019-03-06T09:51:23+00:00

BJP Staff