All posts tagged: US

Debi Cornwall investigates the performance of US state control

British Journal of Photography first met the US photographer, Debi Cornwall, back in 2017, when we featured her photobook, Welcome to Camp America. Cornwall explained that while visiting Guantanamo Bay, the setting of the narrative, she was escorted by military personnel at all times, guiding and monitoring her every move. This resulted in hours spent with her guides, whose experiences she inevitably came to know over casual conversation, as they toured her around the prison’s facilities. “I became interested in the human experience of preparing for war and its aftermath,” she explains. “More structurally, in Guantanamo Bay, the truth is stage-managed for public consumption, and I decided I wanted to look at the performance of American power directly.” Using this insight as a springboard, Cornwall’s research led her to look into the sites of military training grounds – 10 in total, visited over the course of three years. More specifically, these were entire mock villages where, “immersive military war games are staged, populated by this cast of characters, ripped from the headlines, if you will,” …

2020-08-27T19:22:34+00:00

OpenWalls Arles 2020: The privilege of peace

We are expanding the exhibition space for OpenWalls Arles 2020. As part of this second open call, we are highlighting photographers whose work relates to the theme: Daily Life. Calls open on Tuesday 10 September 2019 at 2pm (UK time). “American suburbs are, or at least were, the American Dream,” says Taylor Dorrell, “but for kids growing up there, they’re a boring place they want to leave.” Dorrell’s series White Fences explores the lives of teenagers growing up in suburban communities in America’s Midwest. Centred around New Albany, Ohio, where he grew up, the project reflects on the mundanity associated with suburban life, but also captures the beauty of uneventfulness. “There are peace and privilege in this boredom,” he explains. “The suburbs are where nothing happens, but where former generations aspired, and fought, to get to.”  Dorrell began shooting White Fences after completing several projects that focused on US politics. In 2016, he photographed Swing State, which followed the presidential election in Ohio, observed through rallies and protests. “I was interested in making something in …

2019-09-05T16:53:07+00:00

The Unwanted: homeless in America

“If we don’t look at them, or if we try to sanitise it, then it’s not honest to this brutal experience of being homeless,” says Danish photographer Thilde Jensen, who is currently raising funds to publish an impressive four year project on homelessness in America, The Unwanted. Shot over four years in four American cities – Syracuse, Gallup, Las Vegas, and New Orleans, Jensen is currently raising funds on kickstarter to publish the project as a book, which will include 120 colour images, as well as a poem by Gregory George – a homeless man she met in New Orleans – and an essay by Gerry Badger.

2019-03-04T13:52:38+00:00

Irina Rozovsky’s search for the familiar in former Yugoslavia

In 1989, a record number of 71,000 Soviet Jews were granted exodus from the USSR after a century of radical changes, fuelled by a wave of anti-semitism. Between 1988 and 2010 over 1.6 million Jews left the territory of the former Soviet Union, most of them settling in Israel but others heading for Germany, Canada, Australia, and the United States.

Irina Rozovsky was seven years old when her family fled from Russia to America in 1988. “It’s ironic in retrospect,” she says. “The USSR was a closed up place where Jews were discriminated against; in the end we were the ones that got to leave and seek out a better life. It was like winning the lottery.”

Rozovsky, now 37, lives in Georgia, US, with her husband and two-year-old daughter. “In my work I’m always circling back to the beginning of things, which for me is leaving one place and settling in another, adapting to a new life,” she says. “My photographs are not autobiographical, but I guess that history and the search for the familiar echoes in how I see. Not being able to see the place that you remember, I think that drives my photography.”

2019-01-14T13:52:07+00:00

BJP Staff