Author: Flossie Skelton

It’s a Mess Without You: Osceola Refetoff on abandoned dreams in the American West

In his book Examples: The Making of 40 Photographs, Ansel Adams recounts the production history of his 1944 image “Winter Sunrise,” depicting darkened hills beneath the vast, craggy peaks of Mount Whitney, Sierra Nevada. Lone Pine High School graduates had climbed the rocky slopes of the Alabama Hills to whitewash an imposing “L P” against the stone, which the famed American landscape photographer later ruthlessly removed in his negative: “I have been criticised by some for doing this,” he writes, “but I am not enough of a purist to perpetuate the scar and thereby destroy — for me, at least — the extraordinary beauty and perfection of the scene.” Where Adams epitomised idealised landscape photography, which elevated the natural and the elemental in deliberate omission of human interference, some decades later the “New Topographic” era would materialise in partial response. Through the 1970s, the likes of Robert Adams, Lewis Baltz and Catherine Wagner employed landscape photography to visualise man-made America in all its rigorous banality: monochrome warehouses, industrial sites, parking lots. It is between these …

2020-07-30T19:02:25+01:00

1854 Presents: Rory Lewis

23rd June, 6PM (UK Time) | Pre-register now to watch for free From 1854 Media and British Journal of Photography, 1854 Presents hosts free virtual artist talks, Q&As, panel discussions and more with leading figures in contemporary photography. This week, 1854 Presents: Rory Lewis. Rory Lewis is a dedicated portrait photographer who has spent over a decade capturing many of the world’s most recognised faces. Sitters have included the likes of William Shatner, David Cameron, Dame Judi Dench, Sir Derek Jacobi, Iain Glen and Natalie Dormer. Rory’s images have been exhibited on both sides of the Atlantic, with several of his portraits having been acquired by the National Portrait Gallery in London. In this free and exclusive live stream event, Rory will unpack his approach to portraiture alongside key sittings from his portfolio, including Patrick Stewart, Sir Ian McKellen and others. He will be discussing technique, lighting, direction and the broader inspiration behind his work. Pre-register now to watch for free, and stay tuned for more 1854 Presents livestream events View the archive of talks …

2020-07-22T11:13:37+01:00

“Will I ever see my freedom?”: Powerful Portraits of Daily Life from OpenWalls Arles 2020

OpenWalls is an international photography award exhibiting contemporary work in prestigious and historic locations around the world At work, at leisure, awake, asleep, in the street, in reflection. The everyday is, according to 20th century French philosopher Maurice Blanchot, that which is “most difficult to discover”: it is “what we are first of all, and most often”; it is ourselves, ordinarily. But the immediate proximity of our everyday renders its beauty hard to appreciate.  When ‘Daily Life’ was chosen as one of two themes for OpenWalls Arles 2020 — a look at the small moments, the ordinary routines, that make up human existence — we had no idea the exhibition would fall in such an extraordinary year. At the time of writing, the world is slowly emerging from lockdown, persisting through a pandemic that continues to magnify cracks in our systems. Following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minnesotan police in May, the Black Lives Matter movement has erupted around the globe. Across oceans and borders, ways of thinking, acting and existing …

2020-07-21T17:37:05+01:00

1854 Presents: Ying Ang

25th June, 12PM (UK Time) | Pre-register now to watch for free From 1854 Media and British Journal of Photography, 1854 Presents brings the insights and expertise of world-class photography figures off the page and into your living room: from your own home, access exclusive artist talks, Q&As, panel discussions and more to keep you inspired and motivated during the COVID-19 lockdown — all completely free. This week, 1854 Presents: Ying Ang in conversation with Daniel Boetker-Smith. Ying Ang’s critically acclaimed long-form visual storytelling traverses the personal and the political, extrapolating the intensely private domains of PTSD, motherhood and social breakdown into wider political contexts of western capitalism and feminism. Crucially, Ying’s work employs her own lived experiences as a vehicle to interrogate and hypothesise larger, more universal imperatives. Between her first artist book, Gold Coast (2014), and her latest project, Bower Bird Blues, Ying has won numerous awards and accolades worldwide (including the New York Photo Book Prize, a nomination for the Prix Pictet and ‘Book of the Year’ listings from Magnum, Lensculture and …

2020-07-02T17:34:01+01:00

BJP Staff