Author: Marigold Warner

Laundry Art by Ho Wing Ka Jimmi

Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated cities on the planet. It is home to almost 7.5 million people, which works out to roughly 6,000 per square kilometre, or six per square metre. With so many people living in cramped apartments, within one of the world’s most expensive real estate markets, residents are turning to public spaces to execute their everyday chores. Walking around the city, Ho Wing Ka Jimmi noticed how more and more residents were creating improvised washing lines, tied up between street lamps or along the sides of metal fences that line towering apartment blocks. In Hong Kong it is illegal to hang laundry in public spaces, but many do not have enough space for a dryer in their homes, so unless they can afford a laundry service, this is their only option. Curious to find more, Ho continued to explore the city by foot, finding bed sheets draped across park benches, on the fence along the sides of busy roads, and even across whole staircases – the strangest place …

2019-04-24T09:28:03+00:00

World Press Story of the Year winner Pieter Ten Hoopen

“I think that today, we need to be able to tell stories in differently, to be able to connect to as many viewers as we can,” says World Press Story of the Year-nominated Pieter Ten Hoopen. “We’re heading towards a new phase. Before, a single image could become iconic for a whole war, or a situation of despair. Now it’s different, and I think we need to be able to tell stories in a more sensitive way.”

Hoopen’s nominated photographs for World Press Story of the Year follow the movement of thousands of Central American migrants who joined a caravan heading to the United States border between October and November 2018. It is estimated that over 7,000 people – at least 2,300 of them children – joined the trek, making it the largest caravan of migrants in recent history, according to UN agencies.

2019-04-12T09:52:24+00:00

Q&A: Marco Gualazzini, World Press Photo nominee

Born in Parma, Italy, in 1976, Marco Gualazzini began his career as a photographer in 2004, at the age of 28, for his towns local paper La Gazzetta di Parma. Since then he has covered topics such as microfinance in India, freedom of expression in Myanmar, and the discriminations of Christians in Pakistan, which have published in The New York Times, Al-jazeera, The Sunday Times, among many others.

Over the last few years he has been working extensively in Africa, documenting the desertification of what was once one of Africa’s largest lakes, and a lifeline to 40 million people on the continent. Gualazzini’s work has been double nominated for both World Press Photo of the Year and World Press Story of the Year.

2019-04-10T13:59:36+00:00

World Press Photo of the Year nominee Brent Stirton

Petronella Chigumbura is a member of Akashinga, an all female anti-poaching unit that operates in Zimbabwe’s Lower Zambezi ecosystem. In Shona – the native language of Zimbabwe – Akashinga means the brave ones. Many of the members are victims of sexual violence and domestic abuse, recruited by the International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF), and trained rigorously to serve on Africa’s frontline against poaching.

2019-04-10T13:58:53+00:00

World Press Photo of the Year nominee Catalina Martin-Chico

In Catalina Martin-Chico’s World Press Photo of the Year-nominated image, former guerilla fighter Yolanda is photographed with her husband Michael in their home in the Colombian jungle. It is their sixth pregnancy, but for the first time, Yolanda will be delivering a baby.

Until three years ago, when a peace deal was signed with the Colombian government, Yolanda was a member of the country’s largest rebel group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Farc). Pregnancy was forbidden, so many female members underwent abortions. Yolanda has had five abortions – her last pregnancy terminated at six months. “She feels that now, she deserves this baby,” says Martin-Chico.

2019-04-10T14:03:37+00:00

Meet the experts: Offspring Photo Meet returns

Offspring Photomeet will return to Space Studios in Hackney for its sixth annual portfolio review on 7th and 8th June, offering one-on-one sessions with experts from leading galleries and publications, as well as panel discussions with Chloe Dewe Mathews, Alba Zari, and Ramon Pez.

Participants can discuss their portfolio during a choice of either four or eight 20 minute slots with their chosen experts, and the chance of winning the Best Portfolio Award. Reviewers taking part include The Guardian’s Caroline Hunter, Kate Edwards, and Fiona Shields; Save the Children’s Nina Raingold and Ivy Lahon; Mother’s Julie Thymann; and BJP’s Simon Bainbridge and Diane Smyth. Prizes include an exhibition at The Print Space in Shoreditch, as well as a feature in the Royal Photographic Society’s printed journal.

2019-04-05T13:14:14+00:00

BJP Staff