All posts filed under: Portrait of Britain

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Oliver Chanarin’s new installation inspired by Amazon’s distribution centres

Chanarin was poised to embark on a photographic survey of Britain for an installation at SFMOMA, however, confined to his apartment, the artist turned his lens on his partner Fiona Jane Burgess instead. Inspired by August Sander’s photograph the Painter’s Wife, Chanarin has made hundreds of portraits of Burgess at home during lockdown

2020-05-18T19:22:47+01:00

LUMIX Stories for Change: Bringing the stories of New Malden’s North Korean defectors to life

BJP

LUMIX Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. In August 2019, three photographers were awarded a grant and LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Below Catherine Hyland discusses the making of her project. In many ways it has been the ideal assignment, says Catherine Hyland of her recent LUMIX Stories for Change project, an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. “To be given all this creative freedom and told ‘make what you want’, here’s loads of time and a good amount of money – that doesn’t happen very often.” Over the past year, Hyland has spent time with the North Korean community in New Malden, South London, eating with them, listening to their experiences and sharing in many cultural rituals from traditional dances to Korean instrumental lessons, choir practices, K-pop events and even laughter …

2020-06-18T11:00:10+01:00

Portrait of Britain: Kovi Konowiecki on photographing liminal spaces

Kovi Konowiecki began his professional life playing football in Europe. He turned to photography to document his surroundings, and shed light on aspects of his identity that he did not quite understand. His focus has shifted from portraits of orthodox Jews – a series partially created in pursuit of learning about his heritage – to individuals living liminally between belonging and isolation. Last year, Konowiecki’s portrait of identical twins Dick and Clark won a place in the Portrait of Britain exhibition, and his photograph of Antonia and Franka, also twins, earned a place in the first ever Portrait of Britain book. In 2016, Konowiecki was also part of the inaugural Portrait of Britain, and his winning image was featured among 100 others as part of the award’s first public exhibition. Konowiecki has since been selected for the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, and has exhibited his work in a group show in California. He is now preparing for a solo exhibition this Spring in Portugal. His first monograph, Borderlands, will be released at the beginning …

2019-04-01T13:53:46+01:00

A portrait of the real Brexit Britain

Documentary photographer Danyelle Rolla is proud of her roots. That much is clear from her portfolio, which reads like a guide to working-class Britain. Rolla grew up in Norris Green, one of Liverpool’s poorest towns – the type of town, she says, that the press misrepresents as a hotbed of crime and social decay. Out of frustration at this, Rolla has made it her mission to rewrite the narrative of the people and places that have shaped her, by photographing them in a more flattering light. The photograph that won Rolla Portrait of Britain 2018 captures Dotty, an older resident of Norris Green, Liverpool, outside the local pub. She is sporting a perm that might be from the Eighties, with shoulder pads to match. In fact, many of the scenes that Rolla photographs could be from other eras: from kitsch village fetes, to groups of skinheads in bomber jackets. In her playful, sometimes garish, images, she captures a Britain that seems to be longing for the past. This is the same Britain, Rolla’s photographs suggest, …

2020-02-03T10:24:08+01:00

BJP Staff