All posts filed under: Projects

31 women to watch out for

Now in its second year, the PHMuseum Women Photographer Grant has a simple premise – to recognise and award world-class photographers, who also happen to be women. Judged this year by a prestigious panel including Magnum photographer Alessandra Sanguinetti and The Photographers’ Gallery senior curator Karen McQuaid, the Grant has two main sections – The Women Photographer Grant and the New Generation Prize for those under 30 years of age. This year the following series have made the shortlist: Aletheia Casey, No Blood Stained the Wattle Alexa Vachon, Rise Alice Mann, Drummies Anna Boyiazis, Finding Freedom in the Water Ayline Olukman, Psyche Claudia Gori, The Sentinels: Electrosensitivity in Italy Diana Markosian, Santa Barbara Elena Anosova, Out-of-the-Way Eleonora Strano, The Dark Embrace Encarni Pindado, Central American, Women Migration Giya Makondo-Wills, The Came From the Water While the World Watched Gulnara Samoilova, Lost Family Iggy Smalls, Neverland Johanna Maria Fritz, Like a Bird Karolina Gembara, Seven Sisters Ksenia Kuleshova, Abkhazia Laura Pannack, The Cracker Lee Grant, The Korea Project (Working Title) Louisa Boeszoermeny, The State I Am …

2018-11-16T13:39:49+00:00

Roll up, roll up for the Martin Parr Foundation membership scheme

Would you want Martin Parr to take your portrait? You might say its a brave soul who goes in front of his penetrating lens, but it’s part of a portfolio of benefits the Martin Parr Foundation is launching in its Membership Scheme.

Parr set up the Bristol-based Foundation in 2014 to house his archive, but in October 2017 it opened to the public in a purpose-built space, offering free access to much more – a rolling programme of exhibitions, a large photobook library, and a growing collection of prints. Parr’s used the opportunity to hone in on British and Irish photographers, as well as work taken in the British Isles by others, and put the focus on their documentary work – an area which he believes is still underrated.

2018-11-15T10:08:16+00:00

Looking for meaning in Rafa Raigón’s Ikigai

Originally from Andalucia, southern Spain, Rafa Raigón started out in the world of words – acting, and writing plays and poetry. Then he met his partner, a doctor from Berlin, and on moving to Germany, found himself without the necessary language skills to pick up again in theatre. The couple had a child and, staying at home to look after her, Raigón found himself taking photographs instead. “I discovered the creative power of photography,” he says. “The need to express myself led me to photography, finding a tool and a language that allowed me to tell my stories without needing to know German or having friends and people with whom to relate. Now my German is quite advanced and my circle of friends has grown but photography is here to stay and it has become a need in my day-to-day life.” Raigón now has three children, aged 3, 6, and 8, and he’s still the one in charge of looking after them and the house – and he’s also still taking photographs. Taking a one-year seminar …

2018-11-16T13:40:54+00:00

X-ray artist Nick Veasey opens a purpose-built gallery

It’s better-known as a medical process, but x-ray imaging has helped Nick Veasey carve out a very successful career over the last 20 years, working with clients such as the V&A, Adidas, H&M, Time, Harper’s Bazaar, and Vice, and exhibiting at galleries such as Stockholm’s Fotografiska. Now Veasey is opening an exhibition space next to his studio in Kent, rural England, in which visitors can watch him work in a purpose-built x-ray chamber, and see exhibitions by him and other contemporary artists.

Process Gallery is set in the middle of a two-acre site that will be landscaped into a sculpture garden next year. The opening exhibition is dedicated to Veasey’s work, but the photographer plans to show work by other artists, specialising in those who take an alternative approach to process. 

2018-11-12T15:05:26+00:00

Nadia Arroyo will be the new cultural director of Fundación MAPFRE

As of 2019, Nadia Arroyo will be the new cultural director at Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid. She will be replacing Pablo Jiménez Burillo, who announced at a press meeting last week that he would be retiring after 30 years and over 500 curated exhibitions at the museum.

 Jiménez was the first to bring a permanent exhibition space for photography to the museum, and championed the once-undervalued world of nineteenth century Spanish painting, bringing the gallery to the forefront of the art world in Spain. Arroyo is currently Head of Exhibitions at the Fundación MAPFRE.

2018-11-12T14:17:19+00:00

Mistral: The Legendary Wind of Provence

To the people of Provence, the Mistral is a local menace. It regularly ruins weddings, steals hats and scarves with ease and, at its worst, this epic wind has the strength to sweep up metal chairs and smash them into neighbouring windows. Even so, says Rachel Cobb, “I think maybe they actually like it”. “What I feel is that it’s a source of pride among the Provincials, a way of defining the region,” she adds. “They can withstand it, and they’ve learned to live with it.”

Cobb’s new book, Mistral: The Legendary Wind of Provence, is a record of the 20 years she spent hunting the wind. She has holidayed in the south of France for 40 summers now and, though she has been victim to the perils of the strong gales, she’s also found it inspirational – as have many other artists and writers. “I’m energised by it,” she says. “At night, when you hear it stir, you can feel the energy in the air.”

2018-11-12T17:43:54+00:00

Pixy Liao’s Experimental Relationship charts a decade of love

Last year, after 10 years of creating hundreds of images for a project about her relationship, Pixy Liao decided it was finally time to create a book. “I’m not a very productive photographer, so I always felt like I didn’t have enough images” she says, “but ten years felt like the right time”.

As a woman brought up in China, Liao always thought she would end up with an older man who would look after her and protect her. But while studying for an MFA in photography in Memphis, Tennessee, she met Moro, a Japanese musician five years her junior. Being with Moro challenged her own views on how a man or woman should behave in a heterosexual relationship, and so she began to explore this through photography with a project titled Experimental Relationship.

2018-11-12T09:28:10+00:00

On Abortion by Laia Abril

Laia Abril is no stranger to themes of distress. Bulimia, coping with the death of a child, the asexual community, virtual sex-performer couples – these are all topics that the Barcelona-based photographer has explored and attempted to demystify with her multi-layered, story-based practice. The subjects she tackles are complex and provocative, but ones she is able to connect with by way of female empathy, “where I can be involved emotionally”, she says.

2018-11-09T15:46:02+00:00

Winners announced for the 2018 Paris Photo/Aperture Foundation Photobook Awards

Out of nearly 1000 submissions, the winners for this years Paris Photo/Aperture Foundation Photobook Awards, established in 2012 to celebrate the photobook’s contribution to the narrative of photography, have been announced at Paris Photo.

The Photobook of the Year award went to Laia Abril, for part one of her long-term project, A History of Misogyny, Chapter One: On Abortion (Dewi Lewis). The project is not about the experience of abortion itself, but about the repercussions for women who do not have access to legal, safe or free abortions, forcing them to consider dangerous alternatives that cause physical and mental harm.

2018-11-12T16:42:15+00:00

Partying on the edge of disaster

In 1919, a year after the end of World War One and the start of the Weimar Republic in Germany, $1 was worth 48 Marks. By early 1922, $1 bought 320 Marks; by late 1922, $1 bought 7,400 Marks. By 1923, $1 bought 4,210,500,000,000 Marks. “Lingering at shop windows was a luxury because shopping had to be done immediately,” said the artist George Grosz at the height of this hyperinflation.

“Even an additional minute could mean an increase in price. One had to buy quickly. A rabbit, for example, might cost two million marks more by the time it took you to walk into the store. The packages of money needed to buy the smallest item had long since become too heavy for trouser pockets. I used a knapsack.”

2018-11-12T15:15:04+00:00

BJP Staff