All posts filed under: Studio 1854

Documenting the initiative helping people with disabilities explore their sexual identity

Six years ago, Simone Cerio came across a newspaper story that made him sit up and pay attention. Referencing an organisation called LoveGiver, the article was about the practice of sexual assistance in Italy, and its controversy in the context of the law. Sexual assistance is “a holistic practice of massage and erotic stimulation”, says Cerio, one designed to help disabled people develop their sexual identity as well as a sense of their bodies both within the context of a relationship and for themselves alone. “Sexual assistance is confused with prostitution,” the photographer continues. “But the difference is that there is no penetration or oral sex. It’s very different from prostitution, but there isn’t, so far, a clear way to get this practice legalised.” Cerio started to research the subject, contacted the organisation (whose name he adapted as the title of his resulting project, Love Givers) and was subsequently introduced to both practitioners and clients. His work explores, with startling intimacy, a transformative practice that for many people remains unknown. One of the most striking …

2019-10-16T16:29:38+01:00

A photographer’s intimate portrayal of her brother’s autism

A boy lies backwards across a bed, his back arching over a cushion beneath him. His hand reaches towards the viewer and begins to blur; underneath, a handwritten caption reads: “I feel relaxed when I play with string.” This is photographer Erin Lefevre’s brother, Liam, who has autism, and who is the subject of her project Liam’s World. The project was the winning entry in the 2019 Wellcome Photography Prize, and was selected for its intimate portrayal of Liam’s life, made up of tender portraits taken by his sister, and his own reflections on the moments depicted. “I decided to photograph my brother because for years growing up I didn’t understand him,” says Lefevre of the beginnings of her project. She was studying photography at the San Francisco Art Institute, and exploring methods of photojournalism and documenting life around her. “At that time in my life I was starting to see photography as a way to understand the world, and I wanted to use it as a way to better understand my brother, to see …

2019-10-02T10:09:03+01:00

A new open call for powerful visual stories on mental and physical health

Health is a universal topic, no matter your age or demographic. Its impact is transformative, and its challenges can mean life or death. The Wellcome Photography Prize, now open for entry, aims to take this familiar theme and explore it through visual language. While international questions of health, science, and medicine can often feel abstract, photography has the ability to visualise them, provoking a direct and intimate awareness of the issues that Wellcome supports. Wellcome is a global charitable foundation that funds over 14,000 people in 70 countries, supporting scientists and researchers in their work to address contemporary health challenges internationally. Initiated in 1992, and originally aimed at clinical imaging specialists, its annual Photography Prize relaunched last year. The new incarnation aims to celebrate contemporary visual narratives about health and science and bring them to a wider audience, raising questions and awareness through powerful and personal visual storytelling. Last year’s edition of the prize explored Outbreaks — capturing the impact of diseases as they spread. This year’s central theme is Mental Health, inviting entrants to …

2019-09-25T13:33:32+01:00

Stories for Change: Frederick Paxton

Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. This summer, three photographers will each be awarded a grant and a LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Below Frederick Paxton discusses what he has planned. “Often, complex systems of government and geopolitics dominate the narratives of certain countries and sport can offer an unexpected window into these worlds,” writes Frederick Paxton, a photographer and filmmaker based in London. “Through sport, you see expressions of both national and personal identity. By understanding the subculture of the sport you can begin to understand the society that it reflects.”  For his Stories for Change project, Paxton, who is represented by Academy‘s new stills agency, will immerse himself in one sport, in one country. The project could take a number of forms. Paxton wants to be led by the people he meets and the things he experiences — he is is open to the focus being …

2019-09-18T15:00:35+01:00

Women’s football: Taking up space

Alice Mann was selected for the adidas Breaking Barriers commission. Organised by Studio 1854 in collaboration with adidas, the project awarded Mann £10,000 to create a new body of work. Below, a handful of the players who Mann photographed reflect on the personal importance of football, together with the challenges that come with playing a sport often associated with men. The 2019 Women’s World Cup felt remarkably different to previous iterations. In the UK, the BBC committed to broadcasting every game on national television. Broadcasters around the world followed suit. Almost 59 million people watched Brazil play France, making it the most viewed women’s football match of all time. In the UK, audience figures totalled 28.1 million, amounting to 47 per cent of the television-watching UK population, while, in Holland, 88 per cent of Dutch television viewers watched the final. This was the country’s largest television audience since the men’s World Cup semi-final in 2014.  The impact of this should not be underestimated. With such a presence in the media, women’s football entered the mainstream. The …

2019-09-28T17:05:41+01:00

Stories for Change: Catherine Hyland

Stories for Change is an ongoing collaboration between British Journal of Photography and Panasonic LUMIX that celebrates the power of photography in driving positive change. In August 2019, three photographers will each be awarded a grant and a LUMIX S Series kit to create a new body of work around the themes Inclusion and Belonging. Below Catherine Hyland discusses what she has planned. “The North Korean regime is something we all know about,” says Catherine Hyland. “We are completely fascinated by it, yet, when it comes to the community, there are very few people helping them.” For the last 18 months the London-based photographer has been attending K-pop competitions and church services in New Malden, spending time with North Koreans who have settled in London after fleeing their country.  “I’m trying to figure out a way to make something artistic that isn’t just exposing people who are already fragile,” says Hyland. Aware of the sensitive nature of the subject matter, and therefore the importance of forming relationships and gaining trust within the community, Hyland is …

2019-08-19T17:27:32+01:00

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The Duke of Earl

Christopher Bethell crisscrossed the United States in an attempt to understand his own relationship to the country, and the history of his Grandfather. The resulting photographic series was awarded the Under 30’s Gold Award in the Royal Photographic Society’s International Photography Exhibition 2018Christopher Bethell crisscrossed the United States in an attempt to understand his own relationship to the country, and the history of his Grandfather. The resulting photographic series was awarded the Under 30’s Gold Award in the Royal Photographic Society’s International Photography Exhibition 2018

2019-07-08T11:58:04+01:00

BJP Staff