All posts filed under: Video

BJP #7844: Shooting the Rich

When does campaigning documentary photography become political art? Probing this question is at the heart of the latest issue of BJP, which looks at contemporary depictions of wealth and the structures that support it. The global financial crisis of 2007 and 2008 has provoked an outpouring of feeling towards the so-called ‘one percent’ and a new wave of creative responses. It’s a subject that’s having a moment, and rather than the traditional documentation of marginalised communities we’re seeing photographers who are turning their cameras towards the wealthy and privileged. We’ve just scratched the surface in this issue, which features seven recent series, one curatorial project and one archival body of work recently published as a book. But in producing it, we hoped to find out how these projects were made – and perhaps more importantly, why. There’s a range of styles on display that interrogate these ideas in complex ways: while Dougie Wallace has shot in-your-face street portraits, using a flash “to bring out the ridiculous in the situation”, Zed Nelson doesn’t want to “vilify” …

2016-02-02T13:56:32+00:00

BJP #7843: Cool & Noteworthy

With features on more than 20 of the best photography projects of the last year, Cool & Noteworthy looks at the photography practitioners, festivals, exhibitions and publishers that have pushed at the medium of photography in this momentous year of the viral image. You can buy the issue now from the BJP shop. Highlights include an in-depth, all-access look at New York Times Magazine’s redesign, an exploration of Magnum photographers Paolo Pellegrin and Alex Majoli’s collaboration in Congo, festivals in Delhi and Lagos, Cristina De Middel’s remarkably productive year, and our newfound  fascination with contemporary Japanese photography. Simon Bainbridge, editor of BJP, introuduces the new issue: “Whose work most impressed you over the last 12 months? “I like to keep a list of all the things that for one reason or another don’t make it into BJP , but that I wished that we’d found room for or known about them early enough to include. This growing list, along with suggestions from colleagues and friends of the magazine, forms the basis of my thinking for our annual ‘Cool & …

2016-01-13T14:31:06+00:00

BJP #7841: The Idealism Issue

The British Journal of Photography’s November 2015 issue, featuring exclusive photography from Sweden to Nigeria to Japan, is now available to download in the app store or to buy direct from us in the BJP shop. The issue features the enigmatic Swedish photographer JH Engström, who allowed BJP into his home in the Swedish heartlands for a week, for one of the most intimate insights into his process he’s ever revealed. We also talk to the celebrated Spanish photographer Cristina de Middel about her work at the Lagos Photography Festival – and how the Nigerian people are embracing photography wholeheartedly. We go behind the scenes of Burden of Proof, the new exhibition at Soho’s The Photographers’ Gallery, which looks at the relationship between photography and forensic science. Elsewhere in the issue, the influential photographer thinker and writer David Campany explores a very alternative history of photography. Diane Smyth, editor of this month’s issue, introduces the themes of the issue: “At first sight, JH Engström’s faded Utopian architecture, forensic photography, images of dust and the Lagos Photo Festival don’t have much in common, but …

2015-11-24T11:15:43+00:00

BJP #7840: The Fashion Issue

While Continental Europe is only just returning home from holidays, here in London, after a particularly damp August, we’re ready to brighten things up, turning on the style with a month of issues dedicated to fashion, available to order now, as well as a download from the App Store. We’re in good company. Later this month, the fashion cognoscenti will be heading to the British capital for London Fashion Week, where homegrown talents such as Gareth Pugh, JW Anderson and Vivienne Westwood share the runway with international designers, including Maison Margiela, Barbara Casasola and Versus. And London-based fashion magazines such as Pop, The Gentlewoman and Dazed & Confused have just put out their September editions, which are usually the most important of the year in terms of page numbers and ad spend. We’ll be celebrating British talent with a profile of photographer du jour, Jamie Hawkesworth, interviewed by Jason Evans, alongside a visit to the London home of someone who influenced him, Nigel Shafran. We will also be covering the emergence of agencies devoted to mature …

2015-10-19T15:15:49+00:00

VIDEO: Thomas Hoepker on taking the most controversial photo of 9/11

BJP

  On the 14th anniversary of the September 11th terror attacks, we speak to Magnum photographer Thomas Hoepker who documented the destruction. His famous photo depicting the tragedy as a backdrop to a leisurely Brooklyn afternoon attracted controversy, described as “shocking” by Frank Rich of the New York Times for its apparent callousness. But, as is usually the case with Hoepker’s work, there’s more to the image than initially meets the eye.  

2015-09-14T12:44:12+00:00

BJP #7839: California Redux, BJP’s documentary issue, is available to buy now

San Francisco photographers from the 1980s. James Ellroy’s raid of the LAPD archives. An Iranian photographer,  a Magnum legend in the making. Each is featured, exclusively, in the new issue of British Journal of Photography, available to buy now. BJP September 2015 is a documentary issue dedicated to shining a light on the photographers forgotten by their generation, unrecognised by their native culture, but creating acerbic, politically-charged and revealing documentary photography works. We’ve featured these photographers for the fact that photographic canons, the pantheons of accepted greats, can feel pretty permanent while they last. But the celebrated photographer of today can easily be a historical footnote of tomorrow, and the obscure images lost in the archive one day can easily take centre stage the next. This, we think, is what’s happening to the three photographers profiled in this month’s cover image – Mimi Plumb, Janet Delaney and Michael Jang, all of whom hit their stride in California in the 1970s and 80s. Making acute documentary work with a historical or political bent, they never quite got the critical acclaim they deserved …

2016-02-12T11:21:50+00:00

Alessandro Bavari – in the belly of the beast

There are many disparate moments in Alessandro Bavari’s childhood that inform the artist he is today – watching tadpoles hatch, the first time he walked into a Gothic church in Burgundy, losing grip of a balloon and seeing it bob away, meeting its fate against a rose bush. He says these impressions are so profound – a sensation, a feeling of wonder, a sound – they occasionally crop up in his work. Bavari uses mixed-media techniques to create a unique body of work that incorporates both photography and film. He often draws on literary influences, offering his own interpretation using model sets, organic objects, photography and digital manipulation. The results are often macabre, and sometimes irreverent. His ongoing series, Sodom and Gomorrah, is one such unique fusion of media. “Sodom and Gomorrah was first conceived 15 years ago. I was inspired by Invisible Cities, a novel by Italo Calvino, written and published in the 1970s, but which he cultivated over many years through travel notes and reflections, and organised by themes – the five senses, …

2015-08-11T14:29:17+00:00

VIDEO: We Want More, Image Making and Music in the 21st Century

What is music photography? It’s a simple question but one that gets more slippery the more you look at it. With holograms of dead stars such as Michael Jackson and Tupac now ‘performing’ live, and Kurt Cobain a playable character on Guitar Hero, it’s clear depictions of our pop icons have opened up – and meanwhile more open-minded attitudes towards pop culture have allowed fine artists to incorporate popular music, vinyl records, cassette tapes and even rock groups into their work. Grappling with these issues after The Photographers’ Gallery asked me to curate a show on the subject, I decided to set some parameters. First, I restricted myself to full-time, working photographers – not programmers, not producers, not the many amateurs who share images online, not the stars who post images of themselves on portals like Instagram, Vine or YouTube, and not the webcams behind the Boiler Room. I find this work interesting from a sociological and anthropological point of view but maybe not so much from a photographic point of view, so I was …

2015-07-24T13:25:40+00:00

VIDEO: Sound & Vision, BJP’s Music Issue

The latest issue of the oldest photography magazine in the world, available to buy now, has been put together to coincide with the opening of the contemporary music photography show We Want More at The Photographer’s Gallery, curated by BJP Deputy Editor Diane Smyth, from 17 July to 20 September 2015.

2015-07-17T12:50:01+00:00

VIDEO: Cristina de Middel, Benedicte Kurzen and Robin Maddock show different sides of Nigeria

It isn’t often a group photography show can boast the names of Cristina de Middel, Benedicte Kurzen and Robin Maddock. This collaboration, titled Shine Ur Eye, brings together and explores their recent response to living in Lagos, Nigeria, while contrasting each photographers’ dramatically different photographic process. Each photographer found themselves in Nigeria for different reasons, and have responded to the complex layers of Nigerian society in different ways. Exhibited together, their work forms an original photographic essay on Nigeria, recognising the intermingling traditions and practices that shape Nigerian culture. British photographer Robin Maddock is displaying, for the first time, digitised images he discovered in the Nigerian National Museum archive. It contains, he says, “piles of slides, many in a state of decay, like a treasure trove.” The slides are presented as found, with no interference from the photographers, save to present these ethnographic images of masks and other objects as significant insights into Nigerian cultural history and heritage, as well as fascinating photographic records in their own right. The Spanish photographer Cristina de Middel, a former photojournalist, began working  conceptually with the first self-published …

2015-07-10T15:40:33+00:00

BJP Staff