All posts tagged: photography

Meet BJP International Photography Award 2019 judge Sarah Allen, Assistant Curator at Tate Modern

In the second of our interviews with BJP IPA 2019’s judges, we meet Sarah Allen. As assistant curator at Tate Modern, Allen has worked on a number of major shows, the most recent being Shape of Light, the first blockbuster exhibition to explore the relationship between photography and abstract art. Before moving to Tate Modern, Allen worked at a string of leading galleries, including The Hugh Lane Gallery in Dublin, The Guggenheim Museum in New York, and The Photographers’ Gallery, London. Among the high-profile photographers she’s worked with is Mark Ruwedel, who recently made it on to the Deutsche Borse Photography Prize 2019 shortlist with his show The Artist and Society, curated by Allen. We spoke to her about how to get noticed by curators, and what she’s looking forward to seeing in BJP IPA 2019. What are the most exciting things happening in photography at the moment? And what trends do you think we’ll see in 2019? I think there is some extremely important work being made at the moment on the subject of …

2018-12-12T16:47:51+00:00

John Houck’s iterative still-life photography

“Your memory isn’t like a file in your hard-drive that stays the same every time you revisit it. It actively changes,” says John Houck, whose images, just like our memories, can be deceptive. His pieces are made cyclically, by photographing and rephotographing objects, paintings, and sheets of folded paper, adding and removing elements with each iteration. “It’s a way to get at the way in which memory is an imaginative act,” he says.

2018-12-10T15:38:14+00:00

Meet BJP International Photography Award 2019 judge Russ O’Connell, Picture Editor at The Sunday Times Magazine

In the first of our interviews with BJP International Photography Award 2019’s judges, we meet Russ O’Connell. His impressive career has seen O’Connell in editorial roles at celebrity weekly Heat, music magazine Q, and men’s lifestyle guide British GQ. He is currently Picture Editor at The Sunday Times Magazine – which, as the UK’s first colour supplement to a national newspaper, has long been leading the way with editorial photography. O’Connell has worked with superstar photographers from David Bailey to Nadav Kander, and regularly direct shoots with Hollywood actors, world-class musicians and prominent politicians, including – among many others – U2, Rihanna, and Hillary Clinton. When pushed for a career highlight, he can cite memories that most can only dream of: joining Bruce Springsteen on his private jet, and hanging out with Daft Punk in Paris. We spoke to O’Connell about the benefits of entering photography awards, and what he’s looking forward to during BJP IPA 2019. What are the most exciting things happening in photography at the moment? And what trends do you think we’ll see …

2018-12-07T11:14:45+00:00

Bastard Countryside by Robin Friend

“I see the bastard countryside everywhere I go,” says Robin Friend, pointing out of the window of his studio in East London, where an ivy plant has climbed up a nearby wall and is wrapping its vines around a rusting CCTV camera. “I ran with this idea of city and countryside splattering into each other, creating this hybrid nature,” explains Friend, who has been producing photographs for his book, unknowingly at first, for 15 years since he started started his BA in Brighton, where he studied under Jem Southam.

“Bastard countryside” is a phrase coined by Victor Hugo in his novel Les Miserables, in which he describes the city of Paris as an “amphibian”, stretching out into the countryside and devouring everything in its path. It is a zone in which the urban and rural mix, the manmade and the natural, clashing and colliding to create a strange form of beauty and ugliness.

2018-11-30T10:20:07+00:00

Tom Wood: Women’s Market

Almost every Saturday between 1978 and 1999, Tom Wood travelled from his home in New Brighton by ferry and bus to Great Homer Street market, just outside Liverpool city centre in the North West of England. He would spend the morning there photographing the mothers and daughters, kids dressed in matching blue and lilac tracksuits, teenagers chatting away with their curly hair swept up into side-ponies, and grandmothers haggling for of a string of pearl necklaces or a second-hand coat. In the afternoon he’d travel on to either Everton or Liverpool football ground, then back on the bus and ferry, taking pictures every step of the way.

”God knows how many photographs I took,” he says. “When I first began photographing in Liverpool I was just overwhelmed by the people and the place. It was an exciting place to be, I fed off the energy there.”

2018-12-04T11:35:25+00:00

UK-wide street photography exhibition MyTown shortlist revealed

The shortlist for street photography exhibition MyTown has been revealed. Seagulls, greasy spoons cafes, and Notting Hill Carnival all appear in the shortlist, which captures the eccentricities of street life across the UK. Clear Channel, the outdoor media company behind the exhibition, will display the chosen images on their 3000 digital screens in public spaces across the UK. They will also host a pop up exhibition in London on 5 December 2018, where they will announce the winner. As well as the invaluable exposure of a nationwide exhibition, the winner will receive a X100F, Fujifilm’s premium compact camera, and a UK city break of their choosing. MyTown’s mission is to capture the diversity of street life across the UK, as can be seen in the wonderfully varied shortlist. The chosen images feature recognisable and quirky scenes in towns and cities across the UK, including Newcastle, Notting Hill, Brighton and Blackpool. This year, the competition welcomed thousands of entries from both established and emerging photographers, almost tripling the submissions to its first edition in 2017. The …

2018-11-23T10:20:31+00:00

Portrait of Humanity: Alessandra Sanguinetti on youth and portraiture

Alessandra Sanguinetti was born in New York, but grew up in Argentina, where she lived for over 30 years. She began taking pictures during her childhood holidays spent in the Pampas, which are sprawling grasslands covering much of Argentina. It was here that she undertook her first photographic project, On the Sixth Day, a documentation of farming life and the way people interact with the animals they rear for slaughter. But perhaps her best-known project is The Adventures of Guille and Belinda, a series of portraits of two young local cousins, which has expanded as the girls have got older. Sanguinetti is now preparing to judge our inaugural Portrait of Humanity award, in partnership with Magnum Photos. In this interview, she discusses some of her best-known projects, including The Adventures of Guille and Belinda, as well as what interests her about photographing youth, and why it’s important to stay true to yourself. She also offers her advice to aspiring portrait photographers, who are showing us the world through their lens. The Adventures of Guille and Belinda is probably your …

2018-11-26T10:59:52+00:00

Mistral: The Legendary Wind of Provence

To the people of Provence, the Mistral is a local menace. It regularly ruins weddings, steals hats and scarves with ease and, at its worst, this epic wind has the strength to sweep up metal chairs and smash them into neighbouring windows. Even so, says Rachel Cobb, “I think maybe they actually like it”. “What I feel is that it’s a source of pride among the Provincials, a way of defining the region,” she adds. “They can withstand it, and they’ve learned to live with it.”

Cobb’s new book, Mistral: The Legendary Wind of Provence, is a record of the 20 years she spent hunting the wind. She has holidayed in the south of France for 40 summers now and, though she has been victim to the perils of the strong gales, she’s also found it inspirational – as have many other artists and writers. “I’m energised by it,” she says. “At night, when you hear it stir, you can feel the energy in the air.”

2018-11-12T17:43:54+00:00

EyeEm Photographer of the Year announced

The winners were announced during Berlin Photo Week in Germany (10 – 14 October) where all 100 finalists were exhibited in Supermarkt, a repurposed supermarket and exhibition space. Pachnanda received a trip to Berlin for the event, as well as a Sony Alpha camera. As part of the award, Pachnanda will act as the EyeEm ambassador during 2019. Much of his work centres on bold portraits of unusual people, often in urban areas of London. On receiving the Photographer of the Year title, Pachnanda said, “winning an award with so much calibre from an organisation so pivotal to the world of 21st century photography is amazing”. The EyeEm Awards, run by global community and marketplace for photography EyeEm, currently stands as the world’s largest photography competition. This year marked its fifth edition, and it welcomed a record 700,000 entries from 100,000 photographers, hailing from more than 150 countries across the globe. Covering nine diverse categories – ranging from ‘The Creative’ to ‘The Great Outdoors’ – the award attracts a huge breadth of subject matter. This …

2018-10-31T14:36:52+00:00

Portrait of Humanity: ‘I want to make you look at the wonderful people all around you’

Jean-Baptiste Pellerin has been photographing people on the street for over three decades, culminating in his latest project, Backtothestreet, a body of work that encapsulates what it means to make art accessible to everyone. Pellerin uses cement and glue to weld the portraits he takes onto city walls, meaning that all of the photographs taken on the street, and make their way back to the street, where they are exhibited to the public globally and for free. We found Pellerin’s photographs on the streets of Arles, France, during Les Rencontres d’Arles in July 2018. His portraits struck us in their diversity and positivity, showing the individuality, community and unity of the people we encounter in the streets each day, but who we rarely notice. We spoke to Pellerin about his project in light of Portrait of Humanity, a new initiative seeking to prove that there is more that unites us, than sets us apart.   How did you first get into street photography? I started doing street photography about 35 years ago. It was the …

2018-10-12T10:00:24+00:00

BJP Staff